The John Locke Foundation
Cordially invites you to

Shaftesbury Society Luncheon

with our special guest

Nicola Scafetta

- Scientist at Duke University and at the Active Cavity Radiometer
Solar Irradiance Monitor Lab (ACRIM)

The Sun, the Moon, and the Planets: The Astronomical
Origins of Climate Change on Earth


More |

Monday, November 18, 2013
12:00 p.m.

The John Locke Foundation, 200 W Morgan St., Suite 200, Raleigh, NC 27601

Price: $10.00 (for lunch)

How much do the Sun, Moon, and the planets affect our climate?

An extensively peer-reviewed study published last December in the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics indicates that observed climate changes since 1850 are linked to cyclical, predictable, naturally occurring events in Earth’s solar system with little or no help from us.

The author of the paper is Nicola Scafetta, a scientist at Duke University and at the Active Cavity Radiometer Solar Irradiance Monitor Lab (ACRIM), which is associated with the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Scafetta takes issue with methodologies applied by the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) using "general circulation climate models" (GCMs) that, by ignoring these important influences, are found to fail to reproduce the observed decadal and multi-decadal climatic cycles.

Further, Scafetta finds that the IPCC models also fail to incorporate climate modulating effects of solar changes such as cloud-forming influences of cosmic rays throughout periods of reduced sunspot activity. More clouds tend to make conditions cooler, while fewer often cause warming. At least 50-70% of observed 20th century warming might be associated with increased solar activity witnessed since the "Maunder Minimum" of the last 17th century.

Shaftesbury Luncheon talks are free and open to the public. An optional lunch is available for purchase at the event, or participants may brown bag a lunch if they choose.


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