The Locker Room

The news media’s future

Posted by Mitch Kokai at 06:48 AM

Those interested in the future outlook for mass media might be interested in The Atlantic’s new cover story, in which James Fallows discusses the impact of recent changes:
One by one, the buffers between what people want and what the media can afford to deliver have been stripped away. Broadcast TV was deregulated, and cable and satellite TV arose in a wholly post-regulation era. As newspapers fell during the rise of the Internet, and fell faster because of the 2008 recession, the regional papers fell hardest. The survivors, from The New York Times to the National Enquirer, will be what British newspapers have long been: nationwide in distribution, and differentiated by politics and class. The destruction of the “bundled” business model for newspapers, which allowed ads in the Auto section to underwrite a bureau in Baghdad; the rise of increasingly targeted and niche-ified information sources and advertising vehicles; and the consequent pressure on almost any mass offering except for sports—all of these are steps toward a perfected market for information of all sorts, including news. With each passing month, people can get more of what they want and less of what someone else thinks they should have.

You might remember John Hood’s 2008 presentation to the John Locke Foundation’s Shaftesbury Society, in which he discussed the growing importance of ideological media.

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