• Research Report

    The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina: Medicaid Reform that Works for Patients, Providers, and Taxpayers Alike

    posted May 28, 2013 by Katherine Restrepo, Dr. Roy Cordato
    The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina infuses the Medicaid program with winning market-based strategies of competition, accountability, transparency and a common-sense funding structure. Although policymakers should explore additional ways to make the Governor’s proposal even stronger, the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina represents a major step forward in transforming Medicaid into an affordable and successful health care safety net.
  • Research Report

    Flex Growth: A smarter option for North Carolina communities

    posted September 11, 2012 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Michael Lowrey
    In recent years, an increasing number of local governments across the nation and across North Carolina have adopted “Smart Growth” policies. However, North Carolina should look to the future and adopt a flexible growth agenda — Flex Growth. Flex Growth is a market-based system of principles for government land use and development policy, especially at the state and local government levels, based upon the idea that people — and not government bureaucrats and planners — know what is best for themselves.
  • Research Report

    Demand Management: Social engineering by any other name …

    posted October 27, 2010 by Katherine Restrepo, Dr. Roy Cordato
    Over the past decade the “demand side management” (DSM) model of public policy has crept into the state of North Carolina’s approach to regulation. Advocates of DSM are clear in making explicit their goals of social engineering and the rearrangement of lifestyles. The language in their guiding documents are replete with references to “behavior modification” and “restraining and restricting” certain activities or lifestyle choices. DSM is inconsistent with a free society, where the role of government is to respond to constituent demands, not manage and control them.
  • Research Report

    Good Classroom ‘Disruption’: Use the Internet to expand educational options in rural school districts

    posted August 15, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Michael Lowrey
    North Carolina has the infrastructure to expand online course offerings significantly. Districts that enroll few students in online courses generally have a higher per-pupil expenditure than those that enroll a higher number of virtual school students.This report offers several recommendations, including introduce virtual charter schools; expanding online course offerings from private and for-profit companies, community colleges, and universities; and developing off-site high school campuses.
  • Research Report

    North Carolina’s Beach Plan: Who pays for Coastal Property Insurance?

    posted November 30, 2008 by Katie Bethune, Eli Lehrer, Dr. Michael Sanera
    North Carolina's little-known Beach Plan imposes an enormous fiscal liability on the state. Intended largely to provide windstorm insurance for coastal residents unable to find coverage elsewhere, the Plan has grown to become one of the nation's largest entities of its type.
  • Research Report

    Chatham County’s Land Grab: A selfish elite is trying to take over 23,000 acres for their personal benefit

    posted November 11, 2008 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Chatham County’s proposed Corridor Overlay District ordinance, if adopted, represents a radical land-use plan that would allow county government to take control of over 23,000 acres of private land without financial compensation. The “Scenic Overlay” part of the ordinance would transfer over 23,000 acres of private property from private control by landowners to political control by planners and the most powerful interest group in the county.
  • Research Report

    The Anaheim Solution: How N.C. cities can redevelop without using incentives or eminent domain

    posted January 30, 2008 by Katie Bethune, Eli Lehrer, Dr. Michael Sanera
    North Carolina cities and towns can spur redevelopment of their downtowns without using economic incentives or eminent domain to seize private property to give to private developers. The city of Anaheim, California, adopted policies that revitalized its downtown without using eminent domain powers or economic incentives. Under the leadership of Mayor Curt Pringle, Anaheim developed a plan that relied on reducing government regulations and stimulating private-sector investment.

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