• Research Report

    Introduction Letter – NC Overcriminaization Task Force

    posted November 19, 2015 by Jon Guze, Daren Bakst
    In the last two years, academics and scholars of public policy have identified North Carolina as a state with an overly complex criminal code that can ensnare small businesses, farmers, and individuals who unknowingly fail to comply with regulatory rules. In 2014, Professor Jeff Welty of the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Government published an article in the North Carolina Law Review, “Overcriminalization in North Carolina”; and James Copland and Isaac Gorodetski, directors respectively of the Center for Legal Policy and the Center for State and Local Leadership at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, published a primer, “Overcriminalizing the Old North State.”
  • Research Report

    The Map Act: JLF’s amicus brief in Kirby v. NCDOT

    posted November 8, 2015 by Jon Guze, Dr. Roy Cordato
    The John Locke Foundation has a long-standing interest in the Map Act, which we have criticized for being “inefficient, unfair, and unnecessary.” We have repeatedly urged the General Assembly to repeal or reform it. We have also taken a keen interest in Kirby v. NCDOT and in the legal and constitutional issues that it raises.
  • Research Report

    The Map Act: The end of the road?

    posted May 31, 2015 by Jon Guze
    The Map Act is inefficient, unfair, unconstitutional, and unnecessary. It should be repealed.
  • Research Report

    Wrong Way: How the Map Act threatens NC property owners

    posted March 5, 2014 by Tyler Younts
    The North Carolina Map Act virtually freezes property development within proposed road corridors and can encumber and devalue property indefinitely. North Carolina should protect the constitutional property rights of its citizens by repealing or reforming the Map Act.
  • Research Report

    CCNC Flaws: Why Community Care of North Carolina is Failing Patients, Taxpayers, and Policymakers

    posted October 21, 2013 by Jonathan Ingram and Katherine Restrepo, Daren Bakst
    The debate over NC’s Medicaid program pits defenders of the status-quo Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) model against reformers touting Governor McCrory’s proposed Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina. This report identifies and explains CCNC’s flaws and shows how the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina is a far more effective approach to not only improve patient health, but also rein in Medicaid spending and save taxpayer dollars.
  • Research Report

    Flex Growth: A smarter option for North Carolina communities

    posted September 11, 2012 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Michael Lowrey
    In recent years, an increasing number of local governments across the nation and across North Carolina have adopted “Smart Growth” policies. However, North Carolina should look to the future and adopt a flexible growth agenda — Flex Growth. Flex Growth is a market-based system of principles for government land use and development policy, especially at the state and local government levels, based upon the idea that people — and not government bureaucrats and planners — know what is best for themselves.
  • Research Report

    Catch Shares: A Potential Tool to Undo a Tragedy of the Commons in NC Fisheries

    posted May 1, 2012 by Jon Guze, Jon Sanders
    Declining fish stocks are affecting N.C. fishermen and fishing communities despite the U.S. government spending $70 million a year to bail out failing federally managed fisheries under traditional management systems. Catch shares are a transformative approach to fisheries management that inject property rights into the fisheries to produce a sea change in incentives. Catch shares eliminate race to fish, encourage a more discriminating harvest, and reduce bycatch. Research finds strong links between catch shares and improved economic and biological performance of fisheries and that switching fisheries to catch share systems not only slows their decline but possibly stops (or even reverses) it.
  • Research Report

    Raleigh Convention Center: Throwing good money after bad

    posted February 12, 2012 by Kevin Munger, Dr. Michael Sanera, Daren Bakst
    This report examines 52 contracts signed by the Raleigh Convention Center for the period of July–December 2011 and is a follow-up to the September 2008 John Locke Foundation report “The New Raleigh Convention Center: A taxpayer-funded money pit.”

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