• Research Report

    The Map Act: The end of the road?

    posted May 31, 2015 by Jon Guze
    The Map Act is inefficient, unfair, unconstitutional, and unnecessary. It should be repealed.
  • Research Report

    Agenda 2014: A Candidate’s Guide to Key Issues in North Carolina Public Policy

    posted June 1, 2014 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Every two years since 1996, coinciding with North Carolina's races for the General Assembly, the John Locke Foundation has published a revised edition of Agenda, our public policy guide for candidates and voters. Typically as we enter the campaign season, candidates for public office in North Carolina are faced with a daunting task: to develop informed positions on dozens of public policy issues. In the pages of Agenda 2014 we provide a concise and easily digestible guide covering a wide range of specific issues, from taxes and spending to energy policy and education.
  • Research Report

    The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina: Medicaid Reform that Works for Patients, Providers, and Taxpayers Alike

    posted May 28, 2013 by Katherine Restrepo, Dr. Roy Cordato
    The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina infuses the Medicaid program with winning market-based strategies of competition, accountability, transparency and a common-sense funding structure. Although policymakers should explore additional ways to make the Governor’s proposal even stronger, the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina represents a major step forward in transforming Medicaid into an affordable and successful health care safety net.
  • Research Report

    Transportation Priorities for North Carolina

    posted April 2, 2013 by The Hartgen Group and Reason Foundation, Randal O’Toole
    North Carolina has the nation’s largest state-owned highway system (80,200 miles), 72 airports, 120+ transit systems, extensive intercity rail freight and passenger service, and several ocean ports. These resources are a key element in the state’s economic vitality and are central to its economic progress. Recent legislative and gubernatorial changes provide an opportunity for charting new directions for transportation policy, planning and investment. This report summarizes an effort by the John Locke Foundation to make recommendations for improving North Carolina’s transportation system.
  • Research Report

    Flex Growth: A smarter option for North Carolina communities

    posted September 11, 2012 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Michael Lowrey
    In recent years, an increasing number of local governments across the nation and across North Carolina have adopted “Smart Growth” policies. However, North Carolina should look to the future and adopt a flexible growth agenda — Flex Growth. Flex Growth is a market-based system of principles for government land use and development policy, especially at the state and local government levels, based upon the idea that people — and not government bureaucrats and planners — know what is best for themselves.
  • Research Report

    Review of the Triangle Transit Authority’s Response to Questions Regarding Costs and Ridership

    posted May 8, 2012 by Thomas A. Rubin, Dr. David Hartgen, Daren Bakst
    Based on our review of the TTA Response, we continue to have major reservations concerning the feasibility of the Wake County Transit Plan. The TTA Response does not adequately respond to our questions concerning ridership or costs. It does not deal with the inconsistencies in ridership estimated implied in the Plan versus those in the earlier documents and, in fact, introduces new ones. The ridership estimates provided in the TTA Response are several times higher than those implied in the Plan, and the costs per rider are much lower than those implied in the Plan. Further, the Response does not respond to our concerns expressed in the John Locke Foundation’s earlier Review regarding other serious issues. Therefore the TTA Response is deemed inadequate, and our fundamental concerns regarding the costs and benefits of this Plan remain unaddressed.
  • Research Report

    Review of the Wake County Transit Plan

    posted January 30, 2012 by Thomas A. Rubin, Joseph Coletti, Dr. David Hartgen
    The draft Wake County Transit Plan, released in November 2011, proposes a doubling of bus service, new commuter rail service between East Garner and Durham, and light rail service between Cary and northeast Raleigh. The expanded service is proposed to be funded by a 1⁄2-cent sales tax, a $10 increase in vehicle registration fees, increased vehicle rental fees, transit bonds, state and federal funds, and rider fares. The estimated cost of the expanded bus and commuter rail plan is $2.8 B, and the full plan (including light rail) $4.6 billion through 2040.
  • Research Report

    Durham’s Tale of Two Tax Increases: County seeks $26.5 million’s worth of sales-tax hikes for schools and transit

    posted October 18, 2011 by Fergus Hodgson, Dr. Terry Stoops, Dr. David Hartgen, Dr. Michael Sanera, Daren Bakst
    Durham County commissioners are asking voters to approve two sales-tax increases on November 8. The requested increases would amount to $26.5 million per year in new tax revenues. This request comes amid news that state unemployment has been above 9 percent since January 2009 and is currently 10.4 percent.
  • Research Report

    Should NCDOT Add More Piedmont Trains?

    posted April 26, 2011 by Wendell Cox, Daren Bakst
    A high-speed rail proposal for North Carolina would create substantial risks for taxpayers, while doing little to nothing to reduce traffic, help the environment, cut energy use, or create jobs. North Carolina should return the federal high-speed rail grant funding, withdraw its pending application, and seek no more funding for passenger rail.
  • Research Report

    Elective Surgery: Budget deficits require elected officials to reassess course offerings

    posted February 13, 2011 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    North Carolina needs a thorough review of the number and types of courses offered in its public schools, especially during tight budget times. There is no evidence that school districts or the state has conducted an audit of the costs and outcomes or elective courses. A statewide curriculum audit would be a sound way to reduce costs and refocus our curriculum on the core skills that many of our public school students so desperately need.

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