JLF Research Archive

Showing items 276 to 300 of 535

(10.04.07) Polk County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Polk County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $11.1 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.04.07) Rutherford County doesn't need to increase taxes

Rutherford County doesn't need to increase taxes
The Rutherford County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase and a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $25 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.04.07) Surry County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Surry County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $25.1 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.02.07) Pitt County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Pitt County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $50.5 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.02.07) Lenoir County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Lenoir County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $18.6 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.02.07) Cumberland County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Cumberland County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $93.3 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.02.07) Catawba County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Catawba County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $16.3 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(10.02.07) Union County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Union County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $50.5 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Pender County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Pender County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $23.3 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Moore County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Moore County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $16.7 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Brunswick County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Brunswick County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $75 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Chatham County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Chatham County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $24.5 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Greene County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Greene County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on November 6. But the county has about $8.2 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.27.07) Macon County doesn't need a land-transfer tax increase

The Macon County commissioners are asking voters to approve a 200 percent increase in the real estate transfer tax on November 6. But the county has about $21.6 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(9.20.07) Goldsboro in the Rough: The city government has no business being in the golf business

Over the past six years, Goldsboro’s city owned and operated golf course experienced operational losses of over $2.5 million. The city unfairly competes with seven private courses in the area.


(9.20.07) Gastonia's Golf Losses: The city government has no business being in the golf business

Over the past four years, Burlington’s city owned and operated golf course experienced operational losses of over $1.2 million. The city unfairly competes with 14 private courses in the area.


(9.18.07) Minority Report: From a Member of the Wake County Citizens’ Facilities Advisory Committee

What follows is the minority report I submitted to the Wake County Citizens’ Facilities Advisory Committee on Thursday, September 13, 2007. Although I am a member of that committee, the chairs of the committee, John Mabe and Billie Redmond, denied my request to have this report included with the final committee report.


(9.13.07) Reading, Writing, and Handbells: Course Enrollment in the Era of No Child Left Behind

In the era of No Child Left Behind, students have not been discouraged from enrolling in courses other than language arts and mathematics. Both the number of class periods and the number of students enrolled in most courses has increased in concert with enrollment growth. Nevertheless, elementary foreign languages and middle school health and physical education courses have been on the decline.


(9.12.07) APFOs Research Fatally Flawed: One-sided analysis is used to determine "voluntary mitigation" fees

Counties across the state are adopting Adequate Public Facilities Ordinances (APFOs) that require homebuilders to pay fees of up to $14,953 for each new home built.1 County commissioners favoring these ordinances argue that they allow public services to keep pace with population growth. Opponents believe that APFOs actually place an unfair burden on homebuilders and homebuyers because APFOs can significantly increase home prices.


(8.23.07) Next Come the Taxes: Spending growth continues in latest budget

Gov. Mike Easley and the General Assembly continue the spend-and-tax cycle, increasing the General Fund $1.8 billion, 9.5 percent, over last year. General Fund spending on operations reaches $20.7 billion in FY 2007-08, a 43 percent increase in just five years, similar to the five-year period through FY1997-98.


(8.06.07) Electric Shock: North Carolinians would be required to pay for electricity in other states

The legislature passed a law, SB 3, which would require North Carolinians to pay for electricity used by out-of-state residents. SB 3, which is the new, hastily drafted energy bill, was touted as requiring utilities to provide at least 7.5% of their electricity from renewable resources. However, North Carolinians likely will not be the recipient of a significant amount of this electricity.


(8.01.07) Better Instruction, Not More Time: A longer school day and year will be North Carolina’s next education fad

There is no consistent relationship between in-school instructional time in mathematics and a nation’s average score on an international mathematics test. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University concluded that there was no statistically significant correlation between instructional time in math, science, reading, and civics and test scores on international assessments of those subjects.


(7.25.07) A North Carolina Citizen's Guide to Global Warming

North Carolina is headed toward imposing major new regulations and taxes on the consumption and production of energy, all in the name of fighting global warming. But the climate hysteria on which they are based has nothing to do with reality. Whatever the risks of future climate change, they pale in comparison to the risks of the “wrenching transformation” sought by climate alarmists.


(7.18.07) Reform the Reform: How mental health reform went wrong and what lies ahead

North Carolina’s 2001 mental health reform was ambitious and well intentioned but flawed.
Many proven ideas did not make the final version of reform and lawmakers immediately raided the mental health trust fund to cover a General Fund fiscal crisis in 2001.


(7.12.07) The Solution Is School Choice: We already know what to do about North Carolina’s school facilities crisis

North Carolina faces estimates of nearly $10 billion in school facilities needs over the next five years. Since 2000, school choice saved taxpayers over $20 million a year in annual capital expenses. Over the last six years, the yearly capital savings totaled nearly $125 million.


Who Is John Locke

JLF Network Websites & Blogs