JLF Research Archive

Spending & Taxes

Showing items 51 to 75 of 213

(7.22.09) Not the Best of Both Worlds: Tax credit will not save movies but will lose money

A 25 percent income tax credit on film production expenses would cost the state $63.3 million more each year than the current 15 percent credit, which loses $11.2 million. Ernst & Young estimated the state lost $0.02 on each dollar of tax credits assuming all film-related economic activity result from the tax credit.


(6.12.09) The Can-Do Budget: The impossible takes a little longer

The original House budget proposal for fiscal year (FY) 2009-10 used $1.5 billion in Federal bailout funds to craft a budget that spent $19.3 billion. Although it is nearly $3 billion less than the original $22 billion request, the original House plan would have been just $1 billion less than actual appropriations in FY2008-09.


(4.06.09) Tax Reform in North Carolina

North Carolina's system of taxation aggressively interferes with individual liberty and retards economic growth. Policymakers should begin to change the tax system.


(3.16.09) Back to Basics Budget: Responsible savings and reforms

The budget proposal outlined here reduces appropriations in fiscal year (FY) 2009-10 to $18.8 billion, $2.6 billion less than the final budget for FY 2008-09, and similar to the budget for FY 2006-07. In this proposal, per-capita spending adjusted for inflation of $1,969 remains higher than in FY 1997-98 or any year before.


(3.04.09) City and County Budget Crises: When in a hole, first stop digging

This report documents the change in locally generated revenues of 98 North Carolina counties* and the 30 largest N.C. cities between 2002 and 2007. Locally generated revenues increased faster than population and inflation in 96 of 98 counties and 24 of 30 cities. In Union County, revenue increased 48 percent faster than population and inflation over five years. For that reason, many counties and cities are having financial difficulties because they have spent taxpayer revenues on unnecessary or low-priority projects.


(1.14.09) Taxpayer Financing of N.C. Elections: Clearly unconstitutional after the Supreme Court decision in Davis v. FEC

In June 2008, the U.S. Supreme Court in a case called Davis v. Federal Elections Commission struck down a federal law that punished Congressional candidates for spending too much of their own money on their campaigns. Under that law, once personal spending exceeded a threshold level, the opposing candidate was given fundraising advantages.


(1.12.09) Does Avery need a land-transfer tax increase?

The Avery County commissioners are asking county residents to approve a sale-tax increase on February 3. This report identifies over $10 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs; more than triple the amount that the proposed land-transfer tax increase is estimated to produce.


(1.07.09) Spending Beyond Government Means: Even politicians must face fiscal truths

Tax revenue in North Carolina is volatile because of the dependence on income and sales taxes. Proper budgeting would account for the rise and fall in tax revenues over time.


(10.20.08) Does Anson need a sales tax increase?

The Anson County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies more than $5.8 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 17 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.20.08) Does Caswell need a sales tax increase?

The Caswell County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies almost $4.8 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost 28 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.20.08) Does Onslow need a sales tax increase?

The Onslow County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies almost $36.7 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than nine times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.20.08) Does Person need a sales tax increase?

The Person County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies almost $14 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 18 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.14.08) Does Chowan need a sales tax increase?

The Chowan County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies almost $4.5 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 14 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.14.08) Does Polk need a land-transfer tax increase?

The Polk County commissioners are asking county residents to approve a sale-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies over $11 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost 12 times the amount that the proposed land-transfer tax increase is estimated to produce.


(10.10.08) Does Cherokee need a sales tax increase?

The Cherokee County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies nearly $10 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — over 11 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.10.08) Does Columbus need a sales tax increase?

The Columbus County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies nearly $14.2 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost 15 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.10.08) Does Guilford need a sales tax increase?

The Guilford County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies nearly $65.3 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than four times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(10.10.08) Does Tyrrell need a land-transfer tax increase?

For the second time, the Tyrrell County commissioners are asking county residents to approve a tripling of the land-transfer tax (from 0.2 to 0.6 percent), this time on November 4. This report identifies over $6.4 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost nine times the amount that the proposed land-transfer tax increase is estimated to produce.


(9.23.08) Taxpayers’ Return on Investment: North Carolinians get little value for their tax dollars

North Carolina’s relatively high tax burden in the region has not improved the state’s schools, roads, health, or crime as much as would be expected. Per-capita personal income growth also lagged, though population grew faster in N.C. than in most other states.


(8.06.08) Budgeting on Borrowed Time: FY 2009 budget has excessive spending, no saving, and a lot more debt

The North Carolina General Assembly approved a $21.4 billion budget for fiscal year (FY) 2009, up 3.4 percent from FY 2008, with $21.2 billion in appropriations for operating expenses, up 4.0 percent. As usual, the final budget was prepared behind closed doors by the House Speaker and President Pro Tem of the Senate with minimal involvement from all but a dozen legislators of either party and little opportunity for the public or other legislators to review spending proposals before a final vote.


(6.17.08) N.C. House’s FY 2009 Budget: Smaller than the governor’s, but not any better

The North Carolina House passed a $21.35 billion budget for fiscal year (FY) 2009, with $21.18 billion for continuing operations, which would be increases of 3.3 percent and 3.7 percent, respectively, from FY2008. Teachers would receive an average 3.0 percent pay increase and state employees 2.75 percent. Those raises would total $367 million.


(6.11.08) Special-Needs Tax Credits: Giving parents a choice in education

Our public schools are struggling to meet the needs of special-needs students throughout North Carolina. During 2006-07 school year, less than 50 percent of high-school students with disabilities graduated in four years. A legislative analysis found that the state would save at least $3 million a year in the cost of educating special-needs students, so long as at least five percent of the special-needs students in public schools transfer to a private provider or facility.


(5.28.08) Common-Sense TIF Reforms: Ways to Avoid Randy Parton Theatre-Like Debacles and Other Disasters

Tax increment financing (TIF) is a type of public-debt financing that is supposed to promote private economic development in designated districts through the development of public improvement projects.


(5.14.08) Saving, Spending and Taxing: Governor proposes $1 billion in new operating appropriations

Gov. Easley proposed $21.4 billion in state appropriations for continuing operations in fiscal year 2009, up $1 billion (4.9 percent) from the final budget for fiscal year 2008. Combined pay increases, including one-time bonuses, for teachers and state employees total $594 million. Less than a fifth of the $400 million in spending reductions are much more than reclaiming money that would not otherwise be spent.


(4.24.08) Does Greene need a sales tax increase?

The Greene County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $3.3 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs and more than 19 times the amount than the proposed tax increase would produce.


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