JLF Research Archive

Showing items 201 to 225 of 501

(4.14.08) Does Gaston need a sales tax increase?

The Gaston County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $54.4 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost 12 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.14.08) Does Haywood need a sales tax increase?

The Haywood County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $16.2 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — over 10 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.14.08) Does Lincoln need a sales tax increase?

The Lincoln County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $26.3 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — over 17 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.14.08) Does Nash need a sales tax increase?

The Nash County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $18 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — six times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.14.08) Does Wayne need a sales tax increase?

The Wayne County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $39.1 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — almost 15 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.09.08) Does Duplin need a sales tax increase?

The Duplin County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies about $17.7 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 21 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.09.08) Does Lee need a sales tax increase?

The Lee County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies almost $10.3 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — over 6.6 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.09.08) Does Randolph need a sales tax increase?

The Randolph County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $33.5 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 13 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.09.08) Does Stanly need a sales tax increase?

The Stanly County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on May 6. This report identifies $23 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — over 16.7 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.


(4.08.08) Education Tax Credits in North Carolina: Innovation in Education

As one of the oldest forms of school choice in the United States, education tax credits empower low- and middle-income parents to choose schools that best meet their children’s needs. Cost-effective, constitutional, and consistent with federal and state tax policy, tax credits enjoy bipartisan support among education reformers and parents; in fact, the number of states with education tax credits has tripled over the past 10 years. Tax credits create a vibrant education marketplace by making private schooling affordable for low- and middle-income families seeking a fresh start for their children.


(3.26.08) Raleigh’s Neuse River Greenway: Nice place to visit, but you wouldn’t want to live next to it

Greenways are linear parks that benefit users with opportunities for exercise and enjoying nature. However, costs would be forced on homeowners by the City of Raleigh without any countervailing compensation. Users of the greenway, on the other hand, would receive benefits without incurring costs commensurate with the benefits received.


(3.10.08) A Wind Power Primer: Emission reduction negligible for land-intensive, unreliable, noisy, ugly bird-killing turbines

Wind power is generated through large groups of massive industrial wind turbines, sometimes as tall as 50-story skyscrapers. Like the wind itself, wind power is intermittent and extremely unreliable. The wind must be strong enough, but not too strong, to generate power. So wind cannot be used for baseload generation nor to meet peak demand. For example, to avoid a blackout, a Texas grid manager recently had to cut off electricity to some customers, in large part due to a sudden drop in wind power.


(2.28.08) Job Training That Works: Public programs stagnate, while private and charitable training excels

Researchers have consistently found that government-provided job training and placement programs are wasteful, inefficient, and sometimes even counterproductive. Researchers have also consistently found that private providers of job training yield strong, positive results.


(2.27.08) Taxes, Subsidies, and Regulation: A Guide to North Carolina’s Proposed Global Warming Policies

In 2006, North Carolina's Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) formed an advisory group called the Climate Action Plan Advisory Group (CAPAG). This group's task was to develop recommendations for specific actions to help reduce or prevent climate change.


(2.26.08) Jail Diversion Programs: A step toward better mental health reform

Sixteen percent of all jail and prison inmates have serious mental illness. One in every 10 police encounters involves a mentally ill individual.


(2.20.08) Dropout Prevention Grants: Good money for bad ideas

Last year’s 5.24 percent dropout rate was a four-percent increase from the 2005-06 school year and was the highest rate in seven years. Only 70.3 percent of students in North Carolina graduate in five years. Over the last ten years, the North Carolina General Assembly has repeatedly tried to address the troubling dropout problem with no apparent success. The latest initiative, dropout prevention grants, will likely have little short-term or long-term effect on the dropout rate.


(1.31.08) The Anaheim Solution: How N.C. cities can redevelop without using incentives or eminent domain

North Carolina cities and towns can spur redevelopment of their downtowns without using economic incentives or eminent domain to seize private property to give to private developers.
The city of Anaheim, California, adopted policies that revitalized its downtown without using eminent domain powers or economic incentives. Under the leadership of Mayor Curt Pringle, Anaheim developed a plan that relied on reducing government regulations and stimulating private-sector investment.


(1.29.08) By The Numbers: What Government Costs in North Carolina Cities and Counties FY 2006

County and municipal governments provide many key services while taking in billions of dollars in revenue. Their roles grow ever greater as state government shifts more taxing power to localities to make up for money kept by the state. Still, finding comparative data is hard. That's why this report provides information of how much local government costs in every city and county in North Carolina.


(1.24.08) Annual Report on Teacher Pay: N.C. teacher compensation is more than $5,000 higher than the national average

When adjusted for pension contributions, teacher experience, and cost of living, North Carolina’s adjusted teacher compensation is $55,731, which is $5,401 higher than the U.S. adjusted average compensation and $4,811 higher than the U.S. adjusted median.


(1.21.08) Long-Term Care Financing in North Carolina: Good Intentions, Ambitious Efforts, Unintended Consequences

Long-term care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or an individual’s own home, is the largest portion of North Carolina’s Medicaid budget. It is also the fastest growing portion of that budget. As the state’s population ages, it will drive even more demand for these services. Medicaid was not meant to be inheritance insurance for baby boomers, but current policy in North Carolina allows it to be exactly this. Encouraging more people to rely on private payment options, such as reverse mortgages or long-term care insurance, will mean lower state costs for care and better results for individuals. This paper examines the state of long-term care in North Carolina, current abuses of the system, and private payment options.


(12.21.07) Alexander County doesn't need a sales tax increase

The Alexander County commissioners are asking voters to approve a quarter-cent sales tax increase on January 8. But the county has nearly $5.3 million over and above its base budget to meet its needs.


(12.04.07) Why UNC Needs Charter Schools: Charter Demonstration Schools Can Improve Teacher Education

The UNC system has initiated few efforts to strengthen teacher-education programs.

UNC universities should use their power as charter-school authorizers to create on-site demonstration or laboratory charter schools to improve teacher-education programs.


(12.03.07) Drought-Resistant Water: Variable prices can work better than mandatory restrictions

Water is a scarce resource and a commodity. Some water systems do not change water rates based on demand.


(11.19.07) Debt is Debt: Taxpayers on hook for TIFs despite rhetoric

Tax increment financing (TIF) hides the diversion of funds from government services that is inherent in borrowing. It still puts taxpayers at risk for repayment and is more expensive than general obligation bonds or certificates of participation (COPs).


(11.05.07) Leading By Not Doing: Few counties and school districts receive donations, even from pro-tax residents

Every county and school district in North Carolina will accept voluntary contributions. Few people donate to Wake County schools or county programs.


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