JLF Research Archive

Health Care & Human Services

Showing items 1 to 25 of 49

(5.26.16) Economics & Environment: NC CON law is central planning beyond Bernie’s wildest dreams

NC CON law is central planning beyond Bernie’s wildest dreams


(5.26.16) Health Care Update: Could Millennials Make Direct Primary Care Mainstream Medicine?

Could Millennials Make Direct Primary Care Mainstream Medicine?


(5.19.16) Legal Update: A Win by Any Other Name?

A Win by Any Other Name?


(5.11.16) Health Care Update: Union County Early Adopter With Health Care Innovation

Union County Early Adopter With Health Care Innovation


(5.05.16) Health Care Update: Repealing North Carolina’s Certificate of Need (CON) law

Repealing North Carolina’s Certificate of Need (CON) law


(4.22.16) Health Care Update: North Carolina's Obamacare Exchange - and then there were two

North Carolina's Obamacare Exchange - and then there were two


(4.05.16) Health Care Update: North Carolina’s Certificate Of Need Law -- Diagnosing Dysfunction

North Carolina’s Certificate Of Need Law: Diagnosing Dysfunction


(4.01.16) Health Care Update: Committee Rejects Proposal To Reduce MRI Acquisition Costs

Committee Rejects Proposal To Reduce MRI Acquisition Costs


(3.23.16) Health Care Update: 3 Ways North Carolina Can Improve Access To Health Care With Less Government Intervention

3 Ways North Carolina Can Improve Access To Health Care With Less Government Intervention


(2.11.16) Direct Primary Care: Restoring The Doctor-Patient Relationship

Direct primary care restores the incredible value of personalized medicine, benefiting patients, doctors, employers, and the state.


(8.06.15) Adverse Selection: Examining the impact on North Carolina's Health Insurance Exchange

The ACA focuses on expanding coverage through a massive redistribution of wealth in the amount of $1.2 trillion over the next decade. It’s clear that low-income individuals and those with chronic conditions benefit the most from the law’s sliding scale subsidies, but market-oriented tactics can make health insurance (and more importantly medical care) more accessible and affordable and can lessen the risk for insurers to experience adverse selection.


(6.03.15) The Case Against CON: A law that prevents health care innovation

What the healthcare industry needs is a strong dose of disruptive innovation — relaxing regulations that will increase provider competition, force downward pressure on costs, and enhance patient choice. CON ultimately picks who gets to compete within the health care sector. Reforming the law will by no means untangle the complexities of health care, but state lawmakers should capitalize on an opportunity to make one of the most highly regulated industries a little less heavy on the red tape and a little more patient friendly.


(2.09.15) First in Freedom Index

Overall, North Carolina ranks 23rd in the nation and 5th among the 12 states of the Southeast in freedom. North Carolina ranks 16th in fiscal freedom, 18th in educational freedom, 36th in regulatory freedom, and 46th in health care freedom.


(7.30.14) The Mechanics of Medicaid: How Medicaid’s flawed financial design drives program costs

Medicaid’s fundamental flaws stem from the way in which it is funded, as both state and federal government share the total bill. If Medicaid’s federal share was transferred to North Carolina as an annual block grant, it would allow lawmakers to exercise more control over the program and create a stronger incentive to sort out system waste and abuse.


(6.02.14) Agenda 2014: A Candidate's Guide to Key Issues in North Carolina Public Policy

Every two years since 1996, coinciding with North Carolina's races for the General Assembly, the John Locke Foundation has published a revised edition of Agenda, our public policy guide for candidates and voters. Typically as we enter the campaign season, candidates for public office in North Carolina are faced with a daunting task: to develop informed positions on dozens of public policy issues. In the pages of Agenda 2014 we provide a concise and easily digestible guide covering a wide range of specific issues, from taxes and spending to energy policy and education.


(11.25.13) Redistribution of Health: Severe Side Effects of the Affordable Care Act’s Health Insurance Exchanges

Despite it's promises, the federal health care law will bring premium increases to many due to community rating provisions, increased regulation and mandates, and problems with premium and cost-sharing subsidies.


(10.24.13) Certified: The Need to Repeal CON; Counter to their intent, Certificate of Need laws raise health care costs

Four decades’ worth of data and research into CON laws have shown that they fail to lower health care costs; if anything, they raise them. Despite this, North Carolina hosts one of the most restrictive CON programs in the country. State leaders could best prevent unnecessary increases in health care costs by repealing CON.


(10.22.13) CCNC Flaws: Why Community Care of North Carolina is Failing Patients, Taxpayers, and Policymakers

The debate over NC’s Medicaid program pits defenders of the status-quo Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) model against reformers touting Governor McCrory’s proposed Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina. This report identifies and explains CCNC’s flaws and shows how the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina is a far more effective approach to not only improve patient health, but also rein in Medicaid spending and save taxpayer dollars.


(7.10.13) Lessons Learned: How the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina Avoids Kentucky’s Medicaid Reform Mistakes

Gov McCrory’s Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina is an innovative approach to redesign the state’s Old Medicaid system. This report explains the strategies and provisions included in the Partnership that help to ensure North Carolina’s Medicaid reform does not replicate Kentucky’s failings.


(5.29.13) The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina: Medicaid Reform that Works for Patients, Providers, and Taxpayers Alike

The Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina infuses the Medicaid program with winning market-based strategies of competition, accountability, transparency and a common-sense funding structure. Although policymakers should explore additional ways to make the Governor’s proposal even stronger, the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina represents a major step forward in transforming Medicaid into an affordable and successful health care safety net.


(5.20.13) Health Care's New Prescription: The Power To Heal Through Consumer-Driven Medicaid

Medicaid’s ineffective utilization of its unpredictable budget has left the state facing a budget overrun of more than $248 million. Consumer-driven Medicaid reform emphasizes principles of choice, competition, and fiscal responsibility for beneficiaries and providers, giving patients would be able to choose benefits and services that best fit their medical needs from multiple health plans with defined block grants.


(1.05.12) Compensating NC’s Eugenics Victims: Five Ways North Carolina Can Help Right the Wrong

North Carolina forcibly sterilized approximately 7,600 individuals in the 20th Century as part of its eugenics program. Many eugenics victims are still alive in North Carolina. This report offers five ways that North Carolina should compensate the victims before it is too late.


(7.06.11) North Carolina's Forced-Sterilization Program: A Case for Compensating the Living Victims

When North Carolina lawmakers return to budget work next year, they should consider compensation for more than 2,900 living victims of the state's forced sterilization program.


(5.09.11) Reforming North Carolina’s Medicaid Program

Medicaid is a national problem, not just a state problem. All states are faced with the same incentive to grow their Medicaid programs because of the federal match. Unsustainable Medicaid spending is exacerbating the debt crisis at the federal level. It is paramount that state policymakers put pressure on Washington to reform Medicaid and willingly trade the open-ended federal reimbursement of state spending for freedom from federal roadblocks to make common-sense reforms to their programs.


(3.23.11) Repair and Reform Medicaid: Even more essential under ObamaCare

North Carolina has one of the most expensive Medicaid programs in the Southeast, and Obamacare will expand enrollment from 1.3 million people to potentially over 2 million people in 2014. Without Medicaid reform or tighter eligibility, North Carolina will need to cut some services and payments to doctors. Both options will mean worse care for every person on Medicaid. Gov. Bev Perdue and the General Assembly need to push Washington for exemptions from Medicaid restrictions and greater ability to innovate with premium support and encourage patient control of their own care.


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