• John Locke Update

    Fight regulatory dark matter by defining terms properly

    posted May 7, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Regulatory dark matter is an executive agency's policies, guidelines, memos, or interpretive statements of rules that the agency then enforces as if they are the rules themselves. House Bill 361 would make any agency policy, guideline, interpretive statement, etc. implemented as a rule to be "unenforceable." The bill would require any such policy treated as a rule to be formally adopted as a rule first.
  • John Locke Update

    The real lesson from Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights

    posted May 6, 2021 by Brian Balfour
    In the decade for which Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights was fully in effect, its economy far outperformed the national economy. In contrast, during the decades before and after, Colorado’s economy fell short of the nation’s. Also during the TABOR decade, Colorado taxpayers received more than $3 billion in refunds,
  • John Locke Update

    Lack of teachers may threaten learning loss summer program

    posted May 5, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Because teachers have the option of declining summer employment, summer learning programs designed to address learning loss may be short-staffed. Reasons for opting out of the summer learning programs vary, but they fall into three categories: political, financial, and psychological.
  • John Locke Update

    State elections board is trying to make elections less transparent

    posted May 4, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    The NC State Board of Elections is attempting to make our elections process less transparent. The state board’s attempt to limit the number of observers to two per day is contrary to state law. North Carolina citizens have the power to speak directly to the state board about their proposed rule changes.
  • John Locke Update

    Ten fat years

    posted May 3, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    Over the last decade, state legislators held government growth to the rate of growth in inflation and population even while increasing spending on teacher pay and Medicaid. Their restraint made room for rainy-day savings, tax reductions, and economic growth. A constitutional Taxpayer Bill of Rights would preserve North Carolina’s positive momentum.
  • John Locke Update

    How much do teachers make in North Carolina? It depends who you ask

    posted April 30, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    For 2020-21, North Carolina’s average teacher salary is $54,392, which is ranked 34th in the nation according to the National Education Association. The statewide average salary increased by around 21 percent between 2014 and 2021. The NC Association of Educators insists that the calculation of the average is flawed.
  • John Locke Update

    The pandemic’s silver lining: the growing popularity of school choice, Part 2

    posted April 29, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    Learning Loss Education Savings Accounts can remedy the damaging impacts of students being out of the classroom and empower parents to find the educational option that best fits their child’s needs. The American Rescue Plan Act expands the child tax credit to $3,000 or $3,600, depending on the age of the child, and this change can greatly aid the ability of parents to afford private school.
  • John Locke Update

    For cleaner voting rolls, North Carolina should join interstate data-sharing group

    posted April 28, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    Joining the Electronic Registration Information Center would help the boards of elections in North Carolina more effectively conduct the important task of voter list maintenance. The State Board of Elections is already legally empowered to join ERIC, but it needs the General Assembly to pay for it.
  • John Locke Update

    “Lowest cost generation available”: legislators seek to help NC’s electricity consumers

    posted April 26, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    NC's standard in law for electricity provision is least-cost, reliable electricity at the flip of a switch. State electricity policy, however, is too often directed by "stakeholders" whose desires clash with that legal standard, to the detriment especially of poor consumers. House Bill 529 would restore and boost the state's protection of electricity consumers from unnecessarily high costs.

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