• John Locke Update

    Bad Bill Watch: Redistricting Bill Has Some Good Parts but Also Has Fatal Flaws

    posted May 25, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    House Bill 495 (“Redistricting Criteria for 2021”) has several good elements that legislators should include in any redistricting plan they pass. But the bill falls short of ideal in how it mandates the use of political data in the redistricting process. It also fails to protect counties from being unnecessarily split and appears to define “community of interest” to advantage Democrats.
  • John Locke Update

    Academic Transparency Does Not Undermine Professionalism; It Promotes It

    posted May 20, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Academic transparency is one way to guarantee that teachers adhere to the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators, which requires that they do not “proselytize for personal viewpoints that are outside the scope of professional practice.” Teachers have an ethical obligation to separate their personal views from their professional responsibilities, particularly when discussing issues as contentious as the conflict in the Middle East.
  • John Locke Update

    State elections board is trying to make elections less transparent

    posted May 4, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    The NC State Board of Elections is attempting to make our elections process less transparent. The state board’s attempt to limit the number of observers to two per day is contrary to state law. North Carolina citizens have the power to speak directly to the state board about their proposed rule changes.
  • John Locke Update

    For cleaner voting rolls, North Carolina should join interstate data-sharing group

    posted April 28, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    Joining the Electronic Registration Information Center would help the boards of elections in North Carolina more effectively conduct the important task of voter list maintenance. The State Board of Elections is already legally empowered to join ERIC, but it needs the General Assembly to pay for it.
  • John Locke Update

    Why EMA reform is so urgent: Cooper’s abuse of emergency powers is a year old

    posted March 17, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    On March 17, 2020, Gov. Cooper used emergency powers to shut down restaurants and bars to in-person eating and drinking, and he did so without concurrence from the Council of State, as required by the EMA. Cooper then claimed authority elsewhere in state law, setting a dangerous precedent that legislators must fix by reforming the EMA.

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