• Research Report

    North Carolina’s Capital Gains Tax: It’s time to consider a change

    posted September 14, 2014 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Capital gains taxes penalize saving, investment, and therefore entrepreneurship, by imposing a second layer of taxation on equity investment. The most straightforward way to end this bias is to eliminate the tax on capital gains completely.
  • Research Report

    Lower Taxes, Higher Growth: Scholarly Research Reveals Economic Benefits of Fiscal Restraint

    posted April 14, 2014 by John Hood
    Most studies find that lower levels of taxes and spending, less-intrusive regulation, and lower energy prices correlate with stronger economic performance. The implications of this research track well with recent public policies adopted in North Carolina. Judging from the available empirical evidence, North Carolina’s new policy mix is likely to result in stronger economic growth in the coming years.
  • Research Report

    Three Truths of Tax Reform: Senate, House plans would spur growth, create jobs

    posted June 19, 2013 by John Hood
    The House and Senate tax bills now under discussion in the General Assembly would constitute fundamental tax reform, but will not prevent state government from funding core public services such as public schools and universities. They will, however, increase job creation and economic growth.
  • Research Report

    Guild By Association: N.C.’s Aggressive Occupational Licensing Hurts Job Creation and Raises Consumer Costs

    posted January 27, 2013 by Jon Sanders
    North Carolina features over 50 occupational licensing boards, more than most other states. In practice, it protects current members of a profession from competition, while increasing costs to consumers and would-be professionals blocked from the field. Economists studying occupational licensing generally find it restricts the supply of labor and drives up the price of labor and services. Without state licensure, private providers of reviews and certification, internet sites and consumer applications, social media, and competitors and market forces would ensure quality and safety. The government would still enforce safety and quality through the court system.

Economic Growth & Development by Author