• Research Report

    The First 100 Days: Eleven Action Items for the 2011 Legislative Session

    posted November 11, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This report highlights eleven action items that North Carolina’s new General Assembly should seek to implement in the first 100 days of the 2011 legislative session. These items touch upon a cross section of public policy areas, including education, economic development, property rights, energy and the environment, health care, the budget, and transparency. We at the John Locke Foundation believe that these items represent straightforward actions that would greatly enhance the liberty and prosperity of North Carolina’s citizens.
  • Research Report

    Perdue’s Regulatory Executive Order: A step in the right direction

    posted October 26, 2010 by Daren Bakst
    North Carolina’s regulatory environment is poor, especially in comparison with other states’. Gov. Beverly Perdue signed a new executive order to modify the rulemaking process and help reduce the costs of regulation, which is a good start, but much will depend on how it is implemented in practice. For true regulatory reform, the legislature needs to build upon the executive order and apply reforms to all agencies.
  • Research Report

    A Taxing Legacy in Cherokee: County voters face vote on higher taxes proposed by rejected commissioners

    posted October 12, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Outgoing Cherokee County commissioners are asking voters to approve a $600,000 tax increase, an amount equivalent to a property tax increase of 1.5 cents per hundred dollars of value. County voters already rejected all three county commissioners who proposed the tax hike, but those lame-duck commissioners have since committed nearly $10 million to expand and renovate the courthouse.
  • Research Report

    Orange Crush: Tax hike would crush taxpayers and county economy

    posted October 4, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Orange County commissioners are asking voters for a $2.3 million tax increase at a time of high unemployment. Since the special county taxing authority was established by the legislature in 2007, voters have turned down 68 of 85 requests for tax increases, sending the message that county commissioners must be more responsible stewards of taxpayers’ hard-earned money.
  • Research Report

    Lotteries and Economic Incentives: Governments need better tools to evaluate tax breaks

    posted September 6, 2010 by Joseph Coletti
    Business incentives are like lottery tickets, providing big rewards for governments if you don’t count the costs. Iredell County modeled the financial costs and benefits of an incentive offered in 2009 and showed a positive net present value for the incentives, but neglected to factor in the opportunity cost of forgoing the next best use for the funds and the likelihood the investment would have happened without an incentive.
  • Research Report

    Budget Crisis Is Opportunity: Bigger budget for FY’11 shows need for policy reform

    posted July 19, 2010 by Joseph Coletti
    The final budget for fiscal year 2011 spends $20.56 billion, $153 million more than the budget for fiscal year 2010. General fund availability in fiscal year 2011 excluding federal funds is $17 million less than was available in fiscal year 2010. A $7 billion shortfall (accounting for federal bailout funds, temporary taxes, pensions and retiree health benefits, etc.) in a $20 billion General Fund requires fundamental reform of state government.
  • Research Report

    Trust But Verify: Open government is better government

    posted December 16, 2009 by Joseph Coletti
    Governments have been seeking ways to adopt or advertise their efforts at open government, sunshine, and transparency. Recent history is rife, however, with examples of how they have failed - such as Gov. Mike Easley's financial dealings and the hole in the state health plan.
  • Research Report

    Why Transparency? Creating trust in government

    posted December 16, 2009 by Joseph Coletti
    Open government is just as important in a modern republic as it was two centuries ago. Larger bureaucratic states threatened to overwhelm the ability of citizens and their representatives to keep track of government.

Government Reform by Author