• Research Report

    Check The Facts Next Time: Asserted Ozone-Asthma Link Has No Foundation

    posted October 15, 2002 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Summary: During debates about air pollution in North Carolina, supporters of more regulation have asserted that high rates of childhood asthma are related to increasing exposure to ground-level ozone. Not only has there been no such increase, but a new study shows there is, if anything, an inverse correlation — the higher the ozone level, the lower the asthma rate. Next time, lawmakers and the media should check the facts before repeating unfounded and politically motivated allegations.
  • Research Report

    Foggy Facts on Smog: NC Ozone Levels Aren’t Bad or Getting Worse

    posted March 6, 2002 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Flawed studies and ignorance about North Carolina air quality have given lawmakers and the general public an inaccurate picture of trends in ground-level ozone, or "smog," in some cases exaggerating public exposure by a factor of 10. This study reexamines air-quality data from monitors across the state, concluding that exposure to dangerous ozone levels is surprisingly rare - and is dropping even without passage of the proposed "Clean Smokestacks" legislation.
  • Research Report

    Will It Be Sami So-So? Caution Warranted on New Air-Quality Studies

    posted January 27, 2002 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    The Southern Appalachian Mountain Initiative (SAMI) is a consortium of eight Southeastern states, including North Carolina, and several federal agencies. It is now beginning to publish its research, more than a decade in the making, and will likely help to shape the debate on air quality for years. State policymakers should be cautious in interpreting SAMI data and analyses, however, due to troubling signs that it may not be looking at both sides of the regulatory equation.
  • Research Report

    The Study that Wasn’t: Touted Report Says Little About Smokestacks Bill

    posted August 19, 2001
    Supporters of the so-called "Clean Smokestacks" bill now under consideration by the state legislature are citing a study they claim proves that the legislation would save the lives of a thousand North Carolinians annually. In fact, the study says no such thing. Its subject matter bears little relationship to the bill's likely impact on North Carolina, which would be limited because most power-plant emissions affecting the state's air quality originate outside North Carolina.
  • Research Report

    Smart Start Loses Gloss: New Studies Question Effectiveness, Finances

    posted August 10, 2001 by John Hood
    Since it was proposed by Gov. Jim Hunt in 1993, Smart Start has generated statewide and even national attention for its intriguing promise of combining public and private resources to boost educational achievement through early intervention. But two recent studies, one of its finances and the other of its effectiveness as an educational investment, challenge Smart Start's extravagant claims of success. The program has attracted little support from the private sector, and does not significantly improve the educational attainment of most preschoolers.
  • Research Report

    The Truth on Global Warming: Smokestacks Bill Could Lead to Costly Regulations

    posted July 4, 2001 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Embedded within "clean smokestacks" legislation now moving through the General Assembly is the creation of a new commission to develop state policies to combat global warming. But the scientific issues involved are complex and unsettled. If North Carolina were to try to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions on its own, it would have a trivial impact on global climate but destroy tens of thousands of jobs, particularly in the state's faltering manufacturing sector.
  • Research Report

    Competition in Electric Power: Strategies For Reform

    posted June 30, 2001 by John Hood
    Author Doug Bandow looks at the ways in which government intervention into the provision of electric power has harmed consumers, and he recommends ways to make the system more competitive. (62 pages-not available online.)
  • Research Report

    House Shaves Growth: Budget Eschews Big Tax Hike, Still Increases 4.4%

    posted June 25, 2001 by John Hood
    The North Carolina House is debating its version of a 2001-03 state budget this week. Although imposing only a $6 million tax hike in contrast to the $233 million tax increase included in the Senate budget House leaders still managed to increase General Fund spending by 4.4 percent in the coming fiscal year, relying on increased collections of delinquent taxes, interagency transfers, and debt-service savings to balance the books. Now the budget battle really begins.
  • Research Report

    Clearing the Air: AlA’s Misleading Attack on NC Air Quality

    posted May 22, 2001 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    The American Lung Association's recent report on ozone fueled a media frenzy in North Carolina, with repeated suggestions that the air in the Triangle and Charlotte was "more polluted than New York City's." The truth is far different. Due to a misleading grading system and a faulty and selective reading of data, the ALA report provides little useful information to North Carolinians about the quality of the air they breathe, and falsely suggests that pollution is increasing.
  • Research Report

    Crisis or Opportunity? Closing Budget Gap Means Rethinking State Role

    posted January 17, 2001 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Gov. Mike Easley and the General Assembly face half-billion-dollar budget deficits (at least) for FY 2000-01 and FY 2001-02. But the problem need not become a crisis. State leaders now have an opportunity to restructure government programs and rethink state responsibilities. Budget savings previously recommended by Locke analysts would yield nearly $600 million this year and $743 million next year enough to close the gap without raising taxes or increasing state debt.

Research Reports by Author

Research Reports by Research Type