• Research Report

    Reining In Regulation A Look At The REINS Act

    posted November 5, 2015 by Jon Sanders
    This paper therefore proposes a state-based REINS Act as a key sunrise provision to prevent adding unnecessary and harmful regulations to the state’s regulatory burden. It describes aspects of a REINS Act for North Carolina.
  • Research Report

    The Regulatory Burden in North Carolina: What Are the Costs?

    posted November 5, 2015 by Paul Bachman, Michael Head, Frank Conte
    This report is an attempt to identify the scope and cost of regulations in the state of North Carolina. The state’s record is mixed in terms of regulatory burden. One prominent index ranks North Carolina fifth in the nation when it comes to business friendliness. In contrast, the John Locke Foundation’s “First in Freedom Index” ranks North Carolina 36th in “regulatory freedom.”
  • Research Report

    The Case Against CON: A law that prevents health care innovation

    posted June 2, 2015 by Katherine Restrepo
    What the healthcare industry needs is a strong dose of disruptive innovation — relaxing regulations that will increase provider competition, force downward pressure on costs, and enhance patient choice. CON ultimately picks who gets to compete within the health care sector. Reforming the law will by no means untangle the complexities of health care, but state lawmakers should capitalize on an opportunity to make one of the most highly regulated industries a little less heavy on the red tape and a little more patient friendly.
  • Research Report

    An Alternative Budget: Response to the governor’s proposed budget for the upcoming biennium

    posted May 17, 2015 by Research Staff
    The John Locke Foundation is continuing its tradition, started in 1995, of offering an alternative to the governor’s budget recommendation. Consistent with prior years, this JLF budget focuses on core government. This budget spends less in both years of the biennium than the governor’s, and only increases spending by 2 percent from the last fiscal year.
  • Research Report

    North Carolina’s E-Cigarette Tax: Where bad tax policy meets special interest politics

    posted July 9, 2014 by Sarah Curry, Dr. Roy Cordato
    North Carolina passed a law during the 2014 legislative session taxing the liquid used in electronic cigarettes at an additional 5 cents per milliliter. This tax will hurt small businesses and violates the most important principle of good tax policy—neutrality. The North Carolina General Assembly should repeal the electronic cigarette tax.
  • Research Report

    Agenda 2014: A Candidate’s Guide to Key Issues in North Carolina Public Policy

    posted June 1, 2014 by Research Staff
    Every two years since 1996, coinciding with North Carolina's races for the General Assembly, the John Locke Foundation has published a revised edition of Agenda, our public policy guide for candidates and voters. Typically as we enter the campaign season, candidates for public office in North Carolina are faced with a daunting task: to develop informed positions on dozens of public policy issues. In the pages of Agenda 2014 we provide a concise and easily digestible guide covering a wide range of specific issues, from taxes and spending to energy policy and education.
  • Research Report

    CCNC Flaws: Why Community Care of North Carolina is Failing Patients, Taxpayers, and Policymakers

    posted October 21, 2013 by Jonathan Ingram and Katherine Restrepo
    The debate over NC’s Medicaid program pits defenders of the status-quo Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) model against reformers touting Governor McCrory’s proposed Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina. This report identifies and explains CCNC’s flaws and shows how the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina is a far more effective approach to not only improve patient health, but also rein in Medicaid spending and save taxpayer dollars.
  • Research Report

    Improving Juvenile Justice: Finding More Effective Options for North Carolina’s Young Offenders

    posted July 16, 2013 by Marc Levin, Jeanette Moll
    Methods to improve the juvenile justice system in North Carolina include adjusting the age of juvenile court jurisdiction and creating a system of blended sentencing. Adult court jurisdiction results in poor rehabilitation of juveniles and higher victimization rates amongst minors. Any apparent savings from keeping 16-17 year olds in the adult system are are ultimately overwhelmed by the costs associated with higher rates of recidivism and revocations.
  • Research Report

    Not Written in Stone: How sunset laws can improve North Carolina’s regulatory climate

    posted June 4, 2013 by Jon Sanders
    Overregulation is a well-recognized problem by members of both political parties and imposes significant costs on the economy through deadweight loss. A stronger form of periodic review, sunsetting is having government regulations, programs, and agencies conclude after a set period of time unless positive action is taken by the government to reauthorize them.

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