• Research Report

    Energy Efficiency, Economic Efficiency and The Pretense of Knowledge

    posted October 12, 2011 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Energy efficiency programs focus on the relationship between one input into the production process, energy, relative to the output generated by that process. This simplistic view makes no consideration for the strong possibility that other inputs -- labor, plastic, steal, copper, glass, etc. -- might actually increase. Economic efficiency, on the other hand, relates total costs to the value of the output that those costs generate.
  • Research Report

    Orange Crush Revisited: County commissioners ask voters a third time for a tax increase

    posted October 11, 2011 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Orange County commissioners are asking voters for a $2.5 million sales-tax increase at a time of high unemployment. Twice before Orange County voters rejected tax increases. Just last November, rural county voters rejected a sales-tax increase by 2 to 1. The ballot offers nothing else for rural voters this time around, while urban voters also must pick candidates for city offices. Commissioners' hopes for a tax increase may hinge on low rural turnout.
  • Research Report

    North Carolina’s Auto Insurance System: Still Unfair, Still in Need of Improvements

    posted April 25, 2011 by Eli Lehrer
    North Carolina’s auto insurance system is unfair to low-risk drivers because it overcharges them in order to subsidize some of the state’s more risky and dangerous drivers. Every insured driver pays a hidden tax, and private insurance companies are guaranteed a profit. This report recommends reforms to improve the system.
  • Research Report

    The First 100 Days: Eleven Action Items for the 2011 Legislative Session

    posted November 11, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This report highlights eleven action items that North Carolina’s new General Assembly should seek to implement in the first 100 days of the 2011 legislative session. These items touch upon a cross section of public policy areas, including education, economic development, property rights, energy and the environment, health care, the budget, and transparency. We at the John Locke Foundation believe that these items represent straightforward actions that would greatly enhance the liberty and prosperity of North Carolina’s citizens.
  • Research Report

    A Million Wasn’t Enough? Montgomery County commissioners want even more tax money

    posted October 17, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Daren Bakst
    Montgomery county commissioners have raised the property tax by nine cents over the last two years, from 58 cents to 67 cents per $100 valuation — a 15.5 percent increase. Now the commissioners want $225,000 tax increase (an amount about the same as another one-cent increase in the property tax). If voters approve this tax increase, the total tax increase over the last three years would be $2.1 million.
  • Research Report

    Strike Four? Despite three strikes on tax hikes, Harnett County officials try again

    posted October 11, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Harnett County commissioners are asking county voters to approve a $1.2 million tax increase at a time of high unemployment. This amount is equal to a property tax increase of 1.8 cents per hundred dollars of value. This is the third time county officials have sought a higher sales tax and the fourth vote on higher taxes since 2007. Voters soundly rejected each of the earlier attempts.
  • Research Report

    Third Time’s Not the Charm: Guilford County still needs better spending, not higher taxes

    posted October 5, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Guilford county commissioners are asking for an $11.6 million tax increase at a time of high unemployment. In 2008, they twice asked voters to pass a tax increase, but by large majorities, the voters turned them down. To illustrate the commissioner’s inability to manage spending and the debt, the county will exceed its debt guideline every year from 2012 to 2016.
  • Research Report

    Good Classroom ‘Disruption’: Use the Internet to expand educational options in rural school districts

    posted August 15, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    North Carolina has the infrastructure to expand online course offerings significantly. Districts that enroll few students in online courses generally have a higher per-pupil expenditure than those that enroll a higher number of virtual school students.This report offers several recommendations, including introduce virtual charter schools; expanding online course offerings from private and for-profit companies, community colleges, and universities; and developing off-site high school campuses.

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