• Research Report

    Sidetracked: Transit and Transportation Policy in North Carolina

    posted March 31, 2001 by Michael Lowrey, John Hood
    Co-authors Michael Lowrey and Jonathan C. Jordan examine North Carolina transportation policy and recommend ways of improving it without resorting to more taxation, regulation, and government control. (38 pages-not available online.)
  • Research Report

    Changing Course III: An Alternative Budget for North Carolina

    posted February 28, 2001 by Don Carrington, John Hood
    The 1995 session of the General Assembly was unique in the history of North Carolina. After years of rapidly increasing state spending, both Gov. Hunt and the legislature expressed an interest in controlling spending growth and cutting taxes. As a result, operating spending grew by only 1.4 percent in FY 1995-96, by far the slowest rate of spending growth in a non-recession year this century.
  • Research Report

    Regulation in North Carolina: A Primer

    posted February 28, 2001 by Michael Lowrey, John Hood
    Like taxes, state and local regulations have an enormous impact on the average citizen as well as on businesses, especially small business — the key to job creation in a vibrant economy. In many ways, regulations are a more onerous and hidden way than taxes for the state to take resources out of the private sector to accomplish what is at least a purportedly public objective.
  • Research Report

    Agenda ’98: A Candidate’s Guide to North Carolina Public Policy

    posted February 28, 2001 by Don Carrington
    This comprehensive briefing on 21 issues facing the state, as well as statistics on government expenditures and outcomes, provides ideas and recommendations on taxes, state spending, education, health care, welfare, and more. Please consult Agenda 2002 for the latest information.
  • Research Report

    Reach for the STARS: A New Education Reform Plan for North Carolina

    posted January 31, 2001 by John Hood
    Education reform in North Carolina has a long history, but has shown mixed results at best. Despite recent improvements in some test scores, the state's public schools still deliver poor-quality services at excessive cost to large segments of the student population. Under the state's new ABC plan, nearly half of all public schools in 1996-97 failed to provide a year's worth of educational progress for a year's schooling. Only 26 percent of N.C. 4th-graders are proficient in reading and 21 percent are proficient in math.
  • Research Report

    Enabling the Disabled: Establishing a State Policy for North Carolina’s Disabled Citizens

    posted December 31, 2000 by John Hood
    Health and human services has become an important government responsibility, second only to education in terms of budget authorization. The disability services system, which serves North Carolina's mentally and physically disabled, receives approximately 17 percent of the funds of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), for a total of $1.25 billion in fiscal 1996. By N.N. Fullwood, Ph.D.

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