• Research Report

    CCNC Flaws: Why Community Care of North Carolina is Failing Patients, Taxpayers, and Policymakers

    posted October 21, 2013 by Jonathan Ingram and Katherine Restrepo
    The debate over NC’s Medicaid program pits defenders of the status-quo Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) model against reformers touting Governor McCrory’s proposed Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina. This report identifies and explains CCNC’s flaws and shows how the Partnership for a Healthy North Carolina is a far more effective approach to not only improve patient health, but also rein in Medicaid spending and save taxpayer dollars.
  • Research Report

    Improving Juvenile Justice: Finding More Effective Options for North Carolina’s Young Offenders

    posted July 16, 2013 by Marc Levin, Jeanette Moll
    Methods to improve the juvenile justice system in North Carolina include adjusting the age of juvenile court jurisdiction and creating a system of blended sentencing. Adult court jurisdiction results in poor rehabilitation of juveniles and higher victimization rates amongst minors. Any apparent savings from keeping 16-17 year olds in the adult system are are ultimately overwhelmed by the costs associated with higher rates of recidivism and revocations.
  • Research Report

    Not Written in Stone: How sunset laws can improve North Carolina’s regulatory climate

    posted June 4, 2013 by Jon Sanders
    Overregulation is a well-recognized problem by members of both political parties and imposes significant costs on the economy through deadweight loss. A stronger form of periodic review, sunsetting is having government regulations, programs, and agencies conclude after a set period of time unless positive action is taken by the government to reauthorize them.
  • Research Report

    By The Numbers: What Government Costs in North Carolina Cities and Counties FY 2011

    posted April 21, 2013 by Michael Lowrey
    Counties and towns are critical levels of government in North Carolina, providing or administering many services while taking in billions of dollars of revenue. This is especially true as the state government has increasingly shifted more taxing authority to localities to make up for money kept by the state. While the importance of county and municipal government is great, obtaining comparative data is difficult. To help address this problem, By The Numbers provides information on how much local government costs in every city and county in North Carolina.
  • Research Report

    N.C.’s Auto Insurance System Seven Things to Understand

    posted March 25, 2013 by Alan Smith, R.J. Lehmann
    North Carolina's automotive insurance system delivers a good deal for insurers, but not for drivers. The overregulated system makes guarantees a profit for insurers, raises rates for good drivers, and pushes more than a fifth of NC drivers into residual markets.
  • Research Report

    For Their Own Good: Ban on high-cost lending leaves poor consumers worse off, with fewer choices

    posted February 26, 2013 by Jon Sanders
    A 1997 bill that exempted “payday lenders” from state usury laws was allowed to sunset in 2001, and the last storefront lenders were shut down in 2005. Getting rid of payday lending in North Carolina left consumers worse off, leading to more bounced checks, more complaints about lenders and debt collectors, and more filings for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. North Carolina policymakers should expand lending options in this state by legalizing small-scale, short-term and payday lending again.
  • Research Report

    Guild By Association: N.C.’s Aggressive Occupational Licensing Hurts Job Creation and Raises Consumer Costs

    posted January 27, 2013 by Jon Sanders
    North Carolina features over 50 occupational licensing boards, more than most other states. In practice, it protects current members of a profession from competition, while increasing costs to consumers and would-be professionals blocked from the field. Economists studying occupational licensing generally find it restricts the supply of labor and drives up the price of labor and services. Without state licensure, private providers of reviews and certification, internet sites and consumer applications, social media, and competitors and market forces would ensure quality and safety. The government would still enforce safety and quality through the court system.
  • Research Report

    Carolina Cronyism: Introduction, Overview, and Reforms

    posted July 17, 2012 by Jon Sanders
    Cronyism is an umbrella term covering a host of government activities by which an industry or even a single firm or speculator is given favors and support that they could not attain in market competition. This report explains what opens government to cronyism, gives a brief rundown of recent examples of cronyism in North Carolina, and offers several possible reforms.

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