• Research Report

    City Incentives in North Carolina: How Large Cities Are Using Taxpayer Dollars

    posted October 6, 2015 by Sarah Curry
    This study surveys North Carolina’s most populous cities and examines how each conducts economic development in its jurisdiction. Collectively, they entered into 238 economic development contracts worth more than $65 million over the five-year period. Actual payments, however, totaled $20.2 million.
  • Research Report

    North Carolina Budget FY 2015 – 17

    posted September 21, 2015 by Sarah Curry
    For fiscal year 2015-16, the General Fund budget will rise 3.1 percent to $21.7 billion, below the combined rates of population growth and inflation. The following year, the budget will have an overall increase of less than one-percent.
  • Research Report

    Adverse Selection: Examining the impact on North Carolina’s Health Insurance Exchange

    posted August 5, 2015 by Katherine Restrepo
    The ACA focuses on expanding coverage through a massive redistribution of wealth in the amount of $1.2 trillion over the next decade. It’s clear that low-income individuals and those with chronic conditions benefit the most from the law’s sliding scale subsidies, but market-oriented tactics can make health insurance (and more importantly medical care) more accessible and affordable and can lessen the risk for insurers to experience adverse selection.
  • Research Report

    Renewable Energy: Lobby’s report more fog than light

    posted June 3, 2015 by Jon Sanders
    A report circulated among lawmakers by the NC Sustainable Energy Association argues that renewables are not the source of rising electricity bills in the state. However, the report's problems are myriad. State leaders should cut through the noise of tailored industry reports and seek a thorough, comprehensive study of North Carolina energy policy, bearing in mind that ratepayers' chief interest is least-cost, reliable power at the flip of the switch.
  • Research Report

    The Case Against CON: A law that prevents health care innovation

    posted June 2, 2015 by Katherine Restrepo
    What the healthcare industry needs is a strong dose of disruptive innovation — relaxing regulations that will increase provider competition, force downward pressure on costs, and enhance patient choice. CON ultimately picks who gets to compete within the health care sector. Reforming the law will by no means untangle the complexities of health care, but state lawmakers should capitalize on an opportunity to make one of the most highly regulated industries a little less heavy on the red tape and a little more patient friendly.
  • Research Report

    The Map Act: The end of the road?

    posted May 31, 2015 by Jon Guze
    The Map Act is inefficient, unfair, unconstitutional, and unnecessary. It should be repealed.
  • Research Report

    Corporate Tax Incentives: What’s the harm?

    posted May 5, 2015 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    The governor and Republican members of the state legislature are advocating for a host of new incentive programs and the extension and/or expansion of others. However, these programs are likely to harm consumers, investors, and entrepreneurs who are not privy to the subsidies.

Research Reports by Author

Research Reports by Research Type