• Research Report

    No Bureaucrat Left Behind: N.C. public schools add staff at a much faster rate than enrollment

    posted May 27, 2009 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    North Carolina’s public schools continue to add administrative, non-instructional, and instructional support positions at rates that far exceed enrollment growth. Since 2000, North Carolina’s public school student enrollment (Average Daily Membership) has increased by approximately 13 percent, while school personnel has increased by nearly 18 percent. North Carolina’s pupil/staff ratio decreased from nearly 8:1 in 2003 to just over 7:1 in 2006.
  • Research Report

    Dropout Prevention Grants: Legislators need to rethink their approach to the dropout problem

    posted March 23, 2009 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Only 14 of the 100 schools that received services from dropout prevention grant recipients had substantially lower dropout rates and higher graduation rates from the 2006-07 to the 2007-08 school year. Of the five types of recipients awarded grants, grants to non-profit organizations appeared to have the most success.
  • Research Report

    Annual Report on Teacher Pay: N.C. teacher compensation is more than $4,000 higher than the national average

    posted February 2, 2009 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    When adjusted for pension contributions, teacher experience, and cost of living, North Carolina’s adjusted average teacher compensation is $59,252, which is $4,086 higher than the U.S. adjusted average compensation and ranks 14th highest in the nation. In a comparison of Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states, North Carolina’s adjusted teacher compensation is $674 higher than the SREB average adjusted compensation.
  • Research Report

    Main Street, Not Jones Street: The real greed menacing North Carolina is government greed

    posted November 17, 2008 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    During policy discussions, much is made of the greed of private individuals, but rarely is government greed mentioned. Government greed is the lust for power that consumes policymakers — the desire to do whatever it takes to stay in power and to give government more power. In the North Carolina legislature, government greed is alive and well. Ten policy examples discussed in this report reasonably attest to this lust for power.
  • Research Report

    Chatham County’s Land Grab: A selfish elite is trying to take over 23,000 acres for their personal benefit

    posted November 11, 2008 by Dr. Michael Sanera
    Chatham County’s proposed Corridor Overlay District ordinance, if adopted, represents a radical land-use plan that would allow county government to take control of over 23,000 acres of private land without financial compensation. The “Scenic Overlay” part of the ordinance would transfer over 23,000 acres of private property from private control by landowners to political control by planners and the most powerful interest group in the county.
  • Research Report

    Does Anson need a sales tax increase?

    posted October 19, 2008 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    The Anson County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies more than $5.8 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 17 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.
  • Research Report

    Does Person need a sales tax increase?

    posted October 19, 2008 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    The Person County commissioners are asking voters to approve a sales-tax increase on November 4. This report identifies almost $14 million in revenue and savings the county could use to meet its needs — more than 18 times the amount that the proposed tax increase would produce.

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