• Research Report

    A Model Amendment: Protecting North Carolinians’ property rights

    posted January 5, 2006 by Daren Bakst
    North Carolina needs a constitutional amendment to protect property rights that will contain very specific language. This approach will ensure that courts are unable to undermine the rights that the amendment is designed to protect. The amendment should define key terms such as “public use” and expressly prohibit all takings for private use, including those for economic development purposes.
  • Research Report

    Property Rights After Kelo: North Carolina Needs a New Constitutional Amendment

    posted October 16, 2005 by Daren Bakst
    The United States Supreme Court’s opinion in Kelo v. City of New London drastically weakened the property rights of all citizens. North Carolinians can protect themselves by amending the state constitution. An amendment is necessary because state legislation does not provide adequate protection of property rights. All fundamental rights, especially property rights, should be protected in the state’s highest law, the state constitution.
  • Research Report

    Missing Rungs II: Manufactured Housing and Homeownership in North Carolina

    posted June 30, 2001 by Michael Lowrey, John Hood
    Homeownership is a vital component to a stable society and a thriving economy. It is a well-known presumption that owning a home gives an individual a stake in his or her society. For example, according to a recent study by scholars at the University of Chicago and Harvard University, homeowners are 10 percent more likely than renters to work to solve local problems. Another consideration is that homeownership is also the most common form of savings for the average working family. A home is typically the largest investment most families have. By Jonathan C. Jordan and Michael Lowrey
  • Research Report

    Virginian Red Herring: Cross-Border Sales Poor Reason For N.C. Lottery

    posted February 11, 2001 by Michael Lowrey, John Hood
    One of the most common arguments in favor of a state lottery for North Carolina is that the Virginia Lottery attracts as much as $100 million in lottery ticket purchases from North Carolinians. But this revenue loss is exaggerated and dwarfed by the loss of revenue to out-of-state corporations that North Carolina would experience with a lottery. In reality, Virginia receives at most $34 million in state revenues from N.C. residents, while management fees paid out-of-state for operating a N.C. lottery would be at least $36 million.

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