• Research Report

    Reforming North Carolina’s Medicaid Program

    posted May 8, 2011 by Brian Blase, C.L. Gray
    Medicaid is a national problem, not just a state problem. All states are faced with the same incentive to grow their Medicaid programs because of the federal match. Unsustainable Medicaid spending is exacerbating the debt crisis at the federal level. It is paramount that state policymakers put pressure on Washington to reform Medicaid and willingly trade the open-ended federal reimbursement of state spending for freedom from federal roadblocks to make common-sense reforms to their programs.
  • Research Report

    An Economic Analysis of State Tax Changes in North Carolina

    posted May 8, 2011 by David Tuerck, Paul Bachmann, and Michael Head
    The John Locke Foundation asked The Beacon Hill Institute at Suffolk University (BHI) to use its North Carolina State Tax Analysis Modeling Program (NC-STAMP®) to analyze three state tax proposals. The tax changes would provide a powerful stimulus to the North Carolina economy. Employment would increase by 14,922 in 2012, and when fully implemented in 2013 would create 17,016 by leaving more money in the hands of the state’s households and businesses. The combination of individual income tax and sales tax changes would increase real disposable income by $1.1 billion in 2012 and $1.6 billion in 2013. (Revised May 10, 2011)
  • Research Report

    Should NCDOT Add More Piedmont Trains?

    posted April 26, 2011 by Wendell Cox
    A high-speed rail proposal for North Carolina would create substantial risks for taxpayers, while doing little to nothing to reduce traffic, help the environment, cut energy use, or create jobs. North Carolina should return the federal high-speed rail grant funding, withdraw its pending application, and seek no more funding for passenger rail.
  • Research Report

    North Carolina’s Auto Insurance System: Still Unfair, Still in Need of Improvements

    posted April 25, 2011 by Eli Lehrer
    North Carolina’s auto insurance system is unfair to low-risk drivers because it overcharges them in order to subsidize some of the state’s more risky and dangerous drivers. Every insured driver pays a hidden tax, and private insurance companies are guaranteed a profit. This report recommends reforms to improve the system.
  • Research Report

    The First 100 Days: Eleven Action Items for the 2011 Legislative Session

    posted November 11, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This report highlights eleven action items that North Carolina’s new General Assembly should seek to implement in the first 100 days of the 2011 legislative session. These items touch upon a cross section of public policy areas, including education, economic development, property rights, energy and the environment, health care, the budget, and transparency. We at the John Locke Foundation believe that these items represent straightforward actions that would greatly enhance the liberty and prosperity of North Carolina’s citizens.
  • Research Report

    A Million Wasn’t Enough? Montgomery County commissioners want even more tax money

    posted October 17, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Daren Bakst
    Montgomery county commissioners have raised the property tax by nine cents over the last two years, from 58 cents to 67 cents per $100 valuation — a 15.5 percent increase. Now the commissioners want $225,000 tax increase (an amount about the same as another one-cent increase in the property tax). If voters approve this tax increase, the total tax increase over the last three years would be $2.1 million.
  • Research Report

    Speculators’ Tax in Alleghany? County commissioners seek tax grab based on guesses

    posted October 13, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Alleghany County commissioners are asking county voters to approve a $160,000 tax increase at a time of high unemployment. That amount would be equal to a property tax increase of 0.9 cents per hundred dollars of value. County operating budget appropriations for fiscal year 2011 are $570,274 higher than in fiscal year 2009 – an amount 3.5 times as much as what the tax would generate.
  • Research Report

    A Taxing Legacy in Cherokee: County voters face vote on higher taxes proposed by rejected commissioners

    posted October 12, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops, Joseph Coletti, Dr. Michael Sanera
    Outgoing Cherokee County commissioners are asking voters to approve a $600,000 tax increase, an amount equivalent to a property tax increase of 1.5 cents per hundred dollars of value. County voters already rejected all three county commissioners who proposed the tax hike, but those lame-duck commissioners have since committed nearly $10 million to expand and renovate the courthouse.

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