• John Locke Update

    Should North Carolina Restore Salary Supplements for Master’s Degrees?

    posted August 26, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    The state House budget would restore salary supplements for public school educators with a master’s degree. Decades of empirical research failed to establish a relationship between master’s degrees and student performance. Possible research-based compromises include restoring master’s pay for teachers who obtain their degrees in their teaching subject or supporting teachers who pursue National Board Certification.
  • John Locke Update

    An Overview of the N.C. House Education Budget

    posted August 12, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    House budget writers proposed a $25.7 billion biennial budget that would grant an average 5.5% raise to teachers and give multiple bonuses. The House budget would expand private school choice and ease regulations on public charter schools. Lawmakers propose extensive measures to augment academic transparency and accountability.
  • John Locke Update

    Academic Transparency Does Not Undermine Professionalism; It Promotes It

    posted May 20, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Academic transparency is one way to guarantee that teachers adhere to the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators, which requires that they do not “proselytize for personal viewpoints that are outside the scope of professional practice.” Teachers have an ethical obligation to separate their personal views from their professional responsibilities, particularly when discussing issues as contentious as the conflict in the Middle East.
  • John Locke Update

    Schools are not a big driver of COVID-19 cases

    posted November 11, 2020 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Schools are finally beginning to reopen. The urgency of resuming in-person instruction cannot be overstated. Not only has it taken a toll on students’ mental health, learning losses exacerbated by remote learning are devastating and will be most severe among our most vulnerable student populations.
  • Press Release

    Federal law does not stifle N.C. course growth

    posted September 12, 2007
    RALEIGH – Public school students in North Carolina face a growing number of course options, regardless of federal No Child Left Behind standards. That’s a key finding in a new…
  • Research Report

    Reading, Writing, and Handbells: Course Enrollment in the Era of No Child Left Behind

    posted September 12, 2007 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    In the era of No Child Left Behind, students have not been discouraged from enrolling in courses other than language arts and mathematics. Both the number of class periods and the number of students enrolled in most courses has increased in concert with enrollment growth. Nevertheless, elementary foreign languages and middle school health and physical education courses have been on the decline.

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