• John Locke Update

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions Continue to Plummet in North Carolina

    posted June 1, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Counter to popular belief, North Carolina's greenhouse emissions have been falling all century — dramatically. The United States leads the world in reducing CO2 emissions. When people don't know these things, they may be more inclined to accept massive government interventions like Gov. Cooper's "Clean Power Plan," which would leave them materially worse off for no reason.
  • John Locke Update

    Battery storage is not what you think

    posted January 22, 2021 by Dr. Donald R. van der Vaart
    You might think that battery storage would provide power for the time when the sun doesn’t shine. You might think battery storage would eliminate the need for combustion turbines. You might think battery storage would lead to zero emissions of GHGs. In all cases, you would be very wrong.
  • John Locke Update

    The Green Real Deal: Cheap, Plentiful Natural Gas from Fracking

    posted March 26, 2019 by Jon Sanders
    Sen. Bernie Sanders recently called climate change “an existential threat” and blamed it for last weekend’s deadly Alabama tornadoes. Gov. Roy Cooper testified before Congress that climate change…
  • Research Report

    Spotlight 476: Natural Gas

    posted June 12, 2016 by Jon Sanders
    Low-cost Energy Source That Curbs Emissions and Land Impacts
  • Research Report

    Fish Tales About Mercury: Why regulation of mercury is all cost and no benefit

    posted November 7, 2006 by Daren Bakst
    North Carolina utility consumers may face higher rates for no justifiable reason if extreme mercury regulations are adopted. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is regulating, for the first time ever, mercury emissions from power plants. The purpose is to minimize potentially harmful mercury levels in fish consumed by humans. However, there has never been any documented case in the United States of mercury poisoning from fish. Data linking fish consumption to any type of adverse effect in humans is very weak. In addition, the EPA acknowledges that it does not know the impact mercury emissions from power plants have on the mercury levels in fish. Despite the lack of benefits and the additional costs, North Carolina’s Environmental Management Commission (EMC) is considering whether to adopt regulations which exceed the new and stringent federal standards.

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