• John Locke Update

    The Green Real Deal: Cheap, Plentiful Natural Gas from Fracking

    posted March 26, 2019 by Jon Sanders
    Sen. Bernie Sanders recently called climate change “an existential threat” and blamed it for last weekend’s deadly Alabama tornadoes. Gov. Roy Cooper testified before Congress that climate change…
  • Research Report

    Spotlight 476: Natural Gas

    posted June 12, 2016 by Jon Sanders
    Low-cost Energy Source That Curbs Emissions and Land Impacts
  • Research Report

    Fish Tales About Mercury: Why regulation of mercury is all cost and no benefit

    posted November 7, 2006 by Daren Bakst
    North Carolina utility consumers may face higher rates for no justifiable reason if extreme mercury regulations are adopted. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is regulating, for the first time ever, mercury emissions from power plants. The purpose is to minimize potentially harmful mercury levels in fish consumed by humans. However, there has never been any documented case in the United States of mercury poisoning from fish. Data linking fish consumption to any type of adverse effect in humans is very weak. In addition, the EPA acknowledges that it does not know the impact mercury emissions from power plants have on the mercury levels in fish. Despite the lack of benefits and the additional costs, North Carolina’s Environmental Management Commission (EMC) is considering whether to adopt regulations which exceed the new and stringent federal standards.
  • Press Release

    JLF analyst dispels mercury myths

    posted November 7, 2006
    RALEIGH – New state restrictions on mercury emissions from power plants could boost your electric bill without generating any health benefits. That’s a key finding in a new John Locke…
  • Research Report

    State Can’t Change the Weather: Even Global CO2 Reductions Have Little Impact

    posted January 17, 2006 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Dr. Thomas Wigley from the U.S. National Center for Scientific Research has calculated that if the Kyoto Protocol were implemented with 100% compliance it would reduce the increase in global temperatures by between 0.18º F and 0.37º F in 100 years. This amount would be undetectable by standard measuring devices. It is unreasonable therefore to expect that North Carolina, acting along or in consort with other states, could do anything to mitigate future global warming.

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