• John Locke Update

    Cooper’s reckless budget, Part 1: Overview

    posted April 12, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    Cooper’s 2021-23 biennium budget is more a political statement than a realistic proposal. It would leave state government fiscally fragile and at greater risk of layoffs and tax increases in a future recession.
  • John Locke Update

    Spending, Tax Reform, and the North Carolina Economy

    posted November 25, 2019 by Joseph Coletti
    As the 2020 election season gathers momentum, North Carolina’s tax reforms and demands for higher spending on any number of government programs will be front and center. One example is a…
  • John Locke Update

    Budget 2019: Extra Innings

    posted November 13, 2019 by Joseph Coletti
    The state budget battle has entered extra innings. Gov. Cooper signed and vetoed another batch of mini budgets, the ninth round of budget-related legislation since his first budget veto on…
  • John Locke Update

    Putting a Limit on Government Spending

    posted June 15, 2018 by Joseph Coletti
    Large majorities of North Carolina voters support enshrining additional rights and responsibilities in the state constitution in the latest polling by the Civitas Institute. Three-quarters of respondents said people should…
  • Research Report

    House Shaves Growth: Budget Eschews Big Tax Hike, Still Increases 4.4%

    posted June 25, 2001 by John Hood
    The North Carolina House is debating its version of a 2001-03 state budget this week. Although imposing only a $6 million tax hike in contrast to the $233 million tax increase included in the Senate budget House leaders still managed to increase General Fund spending by 4.4 percent in the coming fiscal year, relying on increased collections of delinquent taxes, interagency transfers, and debt-service savings to balance the books. Now the budget battle really begins.
  • Research Report

    A Tale of Three Budgets: Senate Plan Allows Rapid Growth in Spending

    posted May 29, 2001 by John Hood
    The N.C. Senate is debating its budget proposal for FY 2001-03. For all the furor about "severe cuts" in the plan, it would increase total General Fund spending next year at nearly the same rate (4.7%) as Gov. Mike Easley's budget (5.2%), including a 15% increase in health and human services spending vs. Easley's 16.2% hike. Both offer a stark contrast to the Changing Course budget prepared by Locke analysts, which would essentially hold spending constant while cutting taxes.

General Fund spending by Author