• Research Report

    Deregulating Health Insurance and Health Providers in North Carolina

    posted August 24, 2010 by Joseph Coletti
    North Carolina policymakers should eliminate provider licensing, certificate-of-need laws, and mandated health insurance benefits. Short of this, the state can accept alternative forms of credentialing and ensure consumers have the right to purchase optional benefits at additional cost. These regulations limit access to health care providers and health insurance by artificially constraining markets.
  • Press Release

    N.C. mental health reforms need reform

    posted July 17, 2007
    RALEIGH – Increased accountability and a larger private sector role could help improve North Carolina’s troubled mental health system. That’s a major recommendation offered in a new John Locke Foundation…
  • Research Report

    Reform the Reform: How mental health reform went wrong and what lies ahead

    posted July 17, 2007 by Joseph Coletti
    North Carolina’s 2001 mental health reform was ambitious and well intentioned but flawed. Many proven ideas did not make the final version of reform and lawmakers immediately raided the mental health trust fund to cover a General Fund fiscal crisis in 2001.
  • Research Report

    Your Health, Your Choices: Employers and the State Fail to Meet Individual Health Care Needs

    posted April 4, 2006 by Joseph Coletti
    Health care is again a top priority for most Americans. Health savings accounts offer promise and are growing in popularity among companies and individuals. Three states will soon begin consumer-directed Medicaid pilot programs. These are more realistic approaches than proposals by the NC Institute of Medicine and others to expand Medicaid or to force employers to provide health insurance. Individuals, not companies or the state, are best equipped to manage their own health care. Health care reform should start from this premise.
  • Press Release

    Put People First in Health Care Choices

    posted April 4, 2006
    RALEIGH – An expansion of the state-federal Medicaid program is a prescription for more health care problems, a new John Locke Foundation Spotlight argues. Instead, consumers should manage their own…
  • Research Report

    Certificate-of-Need Laws: It’s Time for Repeal

    posted November 27, 2005 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    In North Carolina and 34 other states, if you are a health care entrepreneur and you want to do anything from adding a new wing or extra beds to an existing hospital, to opening an office that offers MRI or other services, you need a “Certificate of Need” from the state. If this sounds like the kind of central planning one might find in a socialist economy – it is. In North Carolina, the central planning authority is known as the Health Planning Development Agency, part of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. The role of this agency is to plan economic activity provided by medical-care facilities. This is done down to the most minute detail, circumventing the most basic function of private decision-making in a free enterprise system, i.e., the allocation of resources based on entrepreneurial insight and risk taking.
  • Press Release

    Analyst: Repeal N.C.’s Certificate-of-Need Laws

    posted November 27, 2005
    RALEIGH — Medical providers in North Carolina must receive permission from the state — called a certificate of need (CON) — to add services such as extra hospital beds or…
  • Research Report

    Get Control of Medicaid: Bringing Costs Into Line Will Help State Budget

    posted February 1, 2005 by Joseph Coletti
    States have three direct policy levers to control Medicaid growth: eligibility, services, and payments. North Carolina’s mix of policies has led to some of the highest costs in the South, but the Blue Ribbon Commission on Medicaid Reform would make it even costlier. Tennessee and Mississippi, the two Southern states with higher per capita costs in 2000, have since made significant changes. Georgia and Virginia present different ways to reduce costs, while a 2001 report for the General Assembly presented largely unexploited savings.
  • Research Report

    A Healthy Debate: Ideas for Addressing the Medical Malpractice Crisis

    posted March 30, 2003 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    North Carolina has now joined many other states and the federal government in debating solutions to the problem of rising costs in medical malpractice insurance. Evidence suggests that flaws in our tort laws and procedures are a major part of the problem. Proposed state legislation to cap “pain and suffering” awards and implement other reforms represents a good starting point, but state lawmakers should also look at a “loser pays” rule and judicial oversight of expert testimony to reduce the impact of junk science and quack medicine on jury deliberations.
  • Research Report

    Agenda ’98: A Candidate’s Guide to North Carolina Public Policy

    posted February 28, 2001 by Don Carrington
    This comprehensive briefing on 21 issues facing the state, as well as statistics on government expenditures and outcomes, provides ideas and recommendations on taxes, state spending, education, health care, welfare, and more. Please consult Agenda 2002 for the latest information.

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