• John Locke Update

    Build NC Bonds: Let Voters Decide

    posted June 7, 2018 by Joseph Coletti
    Let’s just be really clear about the Build NC Bonds proposal to borrow $3 billion for roads making its way, in different forms, through the North Carolina House and Senate:…
  • John Locke Update

    A Fork in the Road for Transportation Funding

    posted January 25, 2018 by Joseph Coletti
    Governments cannot realistically take enough money from citizens to pay for all the repairs and construction people say we need. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimated an unmet need…
  • Press Release

    N.C. public transit much more costly than driving

    posted September 15, 2010
    RALEIGH — Public transit costs much more money than driving, and North Carolina transit systems require huge subsidies to attract any riders at all. A leading national transportation expert reaches…
  • Research Report

    Public Transit in North Carolina

    posted September 15, 2010 by Randal O’Toole
    North Carolina highway users are subsidizing other programs at the rate of slightly more than a penny per passenger mile. The total cost of driving in North Carolina is no more than 22 cents per passenger mile. By comparison, the state average cost of public transit is $1.15 per passenger mile, nearly $1 of which is subsidized by non-transit users. Driving is more energy efficient and produces less carbon emissions than almost any transit system in North Carolina.
  • Research Report

    Why North Carolina Should Not Build High-Speed Rail

    posted June 24, 2009 by Randal O’Toole
    Because of their high costs, tiny benefits, and interference with property rights, North Carolina should not attempt to provide high-speed rail service. Instead, it should use its share of the $8 billion stimulus funds solely for incremental upgrades, such as safer grade crossings and signaling systems, that do not obligate state taxpayers to pay future operations and maintenance costs.
  • Research Report

    Highways and Sprawl in North Carolina

    posted September 24, 2003 by Dr. David Hartgen
    This study carefully reviews the growth of North Carolina’s 1551 Census tracts during the 1990s compared with the locations of major road improvements. Tract data on changes in population, demographics, prior density, and location are merged with detailed data on 312 major road projects completed during the 1990s, and the relationships between road investments and growth are determined for each of the 12 commuting regions.
  • Press Release

    Increase Highway Budget

    posted March 18, 1999
    RALEIGH—North Carolina should spend an additional $410 million annually over the next seven years — without raising taxes — to get back on track in maintaining and expanding the state…

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