• John Locke Update

    Overview of 2018-19 Public School Accountability Results

    posted September 6, 2019 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    The N.C. Department of Public Instruction released the 2018-19 state accountability results this week.  The release included end-of-grade and end-of-course test results, growth (or value-added) scores, school performance grades,…
  • John Locke Update

    The Peculiar Politics of Reading Software for Early Literacy

    posted July 31, 2019 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Who could have predicted that North Carolina educators, lawmakers, and media would spend so much time disputing the reading software selected by the N.C. Department of Public Instruction (DPI)?  I…
  • Research Report

    North Carolina vs. the World: Comparisons of educational inputs and outcomes

    posted January 30, 2012 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This study employs multiple studies and data sources to fill the gaps left by the state’s unacceptable omission of international inputs and outcomes. Overall, the evidence suggests that, despite ample resources, public school students in North Carolina fail to meet or exceed the performance of many of our economic competitors throughout the world. Simply put, the state has failed to "produce globally competitive students," and that failure is a cause for serious concern.
  • Press Release

    Smaller Classes Aren’t Working

    posted January 9, 2006
    RALEIGH – Smaller class sizes do not translate into better public-school performance. That’s the key finding in a new analysis from the John Locke Foundation. The idea behind the state’s…
  • Research Report

    Honey, I Shrunk the Class!: How Reducing Class Size Fails to Raise Student Achievement

    posted January 9, 2006 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    In November, the State Board of Education released the final report of the High Priority Schools Initiative, a four-year, $23 million class-size reduction program targeting low-performing and low-income elementary schools. The report offered no statistical evidence that smaller class sizes raised student achievement. Between the first and final year of the program, fewer schools met their state ABC growth targets and even fewer made Adequate Yearly Progress under the federal No Child Left Behind law. Reduced class sizes failed to significantly increase student performance on state reading assessments. In the future, legislators and policymakers should not fund class-size initiatives because of their expediency or popularity but because they produce measurable gains in student achievement.

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