• John Locke Update

    Build NC Bonds: Let Voters Decide

    posted June 7, 2018 by Joseph Coletti
    Let’s just be really clear about the Build NC Bonds proposal to borrow $3 billion for roads making its way, in different forms, through the North Carolina House and Senate:…
  • John Locke Update

    A Fork in the Road for Transportation Funding

    posted January 25, 2018 by Joseph Coletti
    Governments cannot realistically take enough money from citizens to pay for all the repairs and construction people say we need. The American Society of Civil Engineers estimated an unmet need…
  • Research Report

    Demand Management: Social engineering by any other name …

    posted October 27, 2010 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    Over the past decade the “demand side management” (DSM) model of public policy has crept into the state of North Carolina’s approach to regulation. Advocates of DSM are clear in making explicit their goals of social engineering and the rearrangement of lifestyles. The language in their guiding documents are replete with references to “behavior modification” and “restraining and restricting” certain activities or lifestyle choices. DSM is inconsistent with a free society, where the role of government is to respond to constituent demands, not manage and control them.
  • Research Report

    No, Fix the Roads First: How N.C. has taken transportation out of transportation policy

    posted October 17, 2007 by Daren Bakst
    The Minneapolis I-35 bridge disaster and the poor condition of North Carolina’s bridges should be a wake-up call for policymakers to set sensible priorities for transportation policy. N.C. has 17,782 bridges, of which 5,082 (29 percent) are deemed deficient by the federal government. N.C. ranks 32nd in the nation in percentage of deficient bridges — 10th worst in total number of deficient bridges.
  • Press Release

    N.C. transportation policy needs new priorities

    posted October 17, 2007
    RALEIGH – This year’s high-profile Minneapolis bridge disaster exposes North Carolina’s need for new state transportation priorities. That’s the key finding in a new John Locke Foundation Spotlight report.
  • Research Report

    Traffic Congestion in North Carolina: Status, Prospects, & Solutions

    posted March 18, 2007 by Dr. David Hartgen
    Traffic congestion is defined as the delay in urban travel caused by the presence of other vehicles. This study reviews traffic congestion in each of North Carolina's 17 metropolitan regions. The study determines the magnitude of present and future traffic congestion; the extent to which present plans will relieve or merely slow the growth of congestion; how traffic congestion affects the state's economy; and actions for significantly reducing congestion in the future.
  • Research Report

    A Better Bargain: Meeting North Carolina’s needs without a $1 billion tax hike

    posted February 27, 2007 by Joseph Coletti
    Budgets reflect priorities. When families face a new expense, they must cut back on another expense. Governments do not have this limitation. When legislators find they have spent too much or that there are new activities worth funding, they can raise taxes to make sure the budget balances and pass along the tough decisions to businesses, entrepreneurs, and families.
  • Press Release

    Lawmakers should nix tax-raising schemes

    posted February 27, 2007
    RALEIGH – North Carolina taxpayers would pay the price if state lawmakers endorse complex fund-raising schemes this year. That’s according to a new John Locke Foundation Policy Report. Click…
  • Research Report

    Conquering Traffic Congestion in the Capital City: More Effective Solutions Than Light Rail

    posted August 14, 2006
    For over fifteen years, the Triangle Transit Authority has pursued a regional rail for North Carolina’s capital region, to no avail. At the same time traffic congestion in the Triangle has worsened, with other viable alternatives largely being ignored. Recognizing this, it is important to understand the causes of congestion in order to develop workable solutions to the problem.

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