• Research Report

    Wrong Set of Priorities : GA Set to Approve Tax Hike, 5.2% Budget Growth

    posted September 19, 2001 by John Hood
    State lawmakers will consider today a revised tax and spending plan for the 2001-03 biennium that promises to shove an already teetering economy, buffeted by layoffs and the prospect of war, into a full-blown and painful recession. Its massive tax hike will fuel a healthy increase in wasteful state spending and help to push the state’s tax burden well above that of Massachusetts, California, and all the Southeastern states — and higher than the national average for the first time.
  • Research Report

    War and Our Economy: Conflict Will Worsen Downturn in North Carolina

    posted September 19, 2001 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    The ghastly terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington will have overwhelmingly negative consequences for the nation’s economy, despite the foolish suggestions of some that it will result in a net stimulus. North Carolina’s economy promises to be particularly hard-hit by troop deployments and faltering investor and consumer confidence. Now is the time for state leaders to dedicate themselves to strengthening the economy, not weakening it through massive tax hikes.
  • Research Report

    Recipe for Disaster: Tax Hikes Would Damage State Economic Climate

    posted July 23, 2001 by John Hood
    A new plan from N.C. House Democrats to increase state and local taxes by another $633 million in FY 01-02 would further damage North Carolina's already weakening economy. If passed, the tax hikes would push North Carolina's tax burden higher than the national average for the first time in history, and 12 percent higher than the regional average. Our tax burden would far exceed those of such states as California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.
  • Research Report

    House Shaves Growth: Budget Eschews Big Tax Hike, Still Increases 4.4%

    posted June 25, 2001 by John Hood
    The North Carolina House is debating its version of a 2001-03 state budget this week. Although imposing only a $6 million tax hike in contrast to the $233 million tax increase included in the Senate budget House leaders still managed to increase General Fund spending by 4.4 percent in the coming fiscal year, relying on increased collections of delinquent taxes, interagency transfers, and debt-service savings to balance the books. Now the budget battle really begins.
  • Research Report

    Sales-Tax Hike Not Needed: There Are Better Ways to Help Struggling Localities

    posted June 12, 2001 by Eric Root, John Hood
    Some state lawmakers are discussing a plan to give local governments the authority to raise their sales taxes by up to 1 penny while simultaneously eliminating state tax reimbursements. While it is true that many counties are raising property taxes this year, most have not been starved for revenue during the 1990s. More importantly, the state can give the same assistance to localities without raising taxes by increasing flexibility and assuming more responsibility for Medicaid.
  • Research Report

    Changing Course IV: An Alternative Budget for North Carolina

    posted May 6, 2001 by John Hood, Dr. Roy Cordato, Don Carrington
    North Carolina faces significant fiscal and economic challenges over the next two years. But it need not resort to higher taxes, a state-run lottery, higher debt, or gimmickry to balance its budget. Nor does North Carolina need to skimp on crucial needs such as education and highways. By setting firm priorities within state government, eliminating unnecessary or duplicative programs, and charging users of some services a reasonable price, state leaders can generate sufficient savings to invest in the future needs of the state.
  • Research Report

    Agenda ’98: A Candidate’s Guide to North Carolina Public Policy

    posted February 28, 2001 by Don Carrington
    This comprehensive briefing on 21 issues facing the state, as well as statistics on government expenditures and outcomes, provides ideas and recommendations on taxes, state spending, education, health care, welfare, and more. Please consult Agenda 2002 for the latest information.
  • Research Report

    It’s Spending, Not Taxes Lawmakers, Media Misstating Cause of Budget Gap

    posted January 13, 2001 by Jon Sanders, John Hood
    North Carolina's 1999-2001 budget cycle presents state lawmakers and the Hunt administration with a fiscal challenge — planned spending increases exceed predicted revenues by hundreds of millions of dollars. Some lawmakers and the news media have blamed four years of tax cuts and recent court decisions. This is misleading. By far the biggest cause of the problem was excessive spending growth during much of the 1990s. If state leaders had exercised even modest spending restraint, there would be no fiscal challenge awaiting the state this year.
  • Press Release

    10th Anniversary Set for Feb. 19

    posted January 12, 2000
    RALEIGH — Former Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr will make the keynote address as the John Locke Foundation celebrates its 10th anniversary with a day-long conference and award ceremony on February…
  • Press Release

    Report: UNC Faculty Pay Already Competitive

    posted November 22, 1999
    RALEIGH — As students and faculty debate whether UNC-Chapel Hill should raise its tuition, a new study concludes that the problems to which the extra tuition money would be applied…

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