• John Locke Update

    Is North Carolina a Top State for Teachers?

    posted September 23, 2020 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    North Carolinians do not need WalletHub to tell us that North Carolina teachers have fared well since 2014. Several state-level reports and studies reflect the efforts of the NC General Assembly to prioritize investments in public school teachers.
  • John Locke Update

    Are Teachers Mad or Satisfied? It Depends Who Asks

    posted June 13, 2018 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This month, the New Teacher Center released results from the 2018 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey.  The survey is conducted every two years and captures the opinions of…
  • John Locke Update

    Good News in Teacher Turnover Report

    posted January 10, 2018 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    The State Board of Education received the 2016-17 State of the Teaching Profession in North Carolina report last week.  The report summarizes the attrition and mobility of public school…
  • Research Report

    Learning About Teacher Pay: N.C. teachers are favorably compensated; what they need is merit pay

    posted February 13, 2007 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Adjusted for cost of living, pension contribution, and teacher experience, the state’s average teacher salary is $993 higher than the U.S. adjusted median salary and $2,733 higher than the U.S. adjusted average salary. There is little evidence that a higher average salary or better benefits will, in any significant way, improve recruitment and increase retention of teachers. A system of merit-based pay would provide an incentive for highly qualified individuals to enter and stay in the teaching profession.
  • Research Report

    Truth on Teacher Shortage: Recruitment and retention a challenge, not a crisis

    posted November 3, 2004 by Dr. Karen Y. Palasek
    A recent report published by the NC Center for Public Policy Research concludes that North Carolina is facing a crisis in teacher recruitment and retention. But neither the data on projected student enrollment growth nor teacher retention rates justify such a harsh assessment. Clearly teacher recruitment and retention is a challenge that will always have to be met. The best approach is to reward those teachers who best foster achievement and to differentiate salaries among teachers according to supply and demand conditions in different disciplines.

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