• John Locke Update

    The real lesson from Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights

    posted May 6, 2021 by Brian Balfour
    In the decade for which Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights was fully in effect, its economy far outperformed the national economy. In contrast, during the decades before and after, Colorado’s economy fell short of the nation’s. Also during the TABOR decade, Colorado taxpayers received more than $3 billion in refunds,
  • John Locke Update

    Ten fat years

    posted May 3, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    Over the last decade, state legislators held government growth to the rate of growth in inflation and population even while increasing spending on teacher pay and Medicaid. Their restraint made room for rainy-day savings, tax reductions, and economic growth. A constitutional Taxpayer Bill of Rights would preserve North Carolina’s positive momentum.
  • John Locke Update

    Time to make spending restraint a permanent policy for North Carolina

    posted April 20, 2021 by Brian Balfour
    Conservative spending restraint was key to preparing North Carolina for last year’s economic slowdown. Similar restraint could have avoided the fiscal crisis we experienced in the Great Recession. A Tax and Expenditure Limit added to the state constitution could make wise conservative fiscal policy permanent.
  • John Locke Update

    Cooper’s reckless budget, Part 2: A closer look at appropriations

    posted April 13, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    The largest increase in Cooper's proposed state appropriations would be for employee salaries and benefits. Cooper's proposal does not provide price tags for Leandro or Medicaid expansion. Cooper would also eliminate successful and popular Opportunity Scholarships.
  • John Locke Update

    Cooper’s reckless budget, Part 1: Overview

    posted April 12, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    Cooper’s 2021-23 biennium budget is more a political statement than a realistic proposal. It would leave state government fiscally fragile and at greater risk of layoffs and tax increases in a future recession.
  • John Locke Update

    Tame spending now or be forced to cut it later

    posted November 9, 2020 by Joseph Coletti
    As Milton Friedman often remarked, the bill always comes due. Today’s spending must be paid by taxes, regardless whether those taxes were collected in the past, are collected this year, or will be collected in the future.
  • Research Report

    Waiting for Veto: Latest Budget Proposal Could Explode Governor’s Spending Cap

    posted August 9, 2005 by Joseph Coletti
    Six weeks into fiscal year 2005-06, the General Assembly has a budget proposal from the conference committee. It includes $17.2 billion in spending (up 7.9 percent from 2004-05), over $700 million in higher taxes and fees, and $681 million in extra collections. This spending is well above the governor's spending cap. A constitutional tax and expenditure limit would provide the best insurance against permanent tax increases from reckless spending.

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