• Research Report

    Climate Change: A Survey of North Carolina Business Leaders

    posted May 10, 2004 by Chad Adams, John Hood
    A new survey of North Carolina’s most politically active business executives suggests that they do not agree with the current direction of public policy in the state. A sample of about 300 respondents from every region of North Carolina answered questions about fiscal policy, education, transportation, tax rates, regulation, and ways to improve economic competitiveness. This report provides not only data from the statewide sample but also from six regional subgroups: the Research Triangle, the Piedmont Triad, the Charlotte area, Northeastern North Carolina, Southeastern North Carolina, and Western North Carolina.
  • Press Release

    NC Road Conditions Among Worst in US

    posted February 9, 2004
    RALEIGH — North Carolina’s state-maintained highways now rank among the worst in the nation in such areas as pavement condition and urban congestion according to the findings of a new…
  • Press Release

    Examining Roads and Sprawl in NC

    posted September 28, 2003
    RALEIGH — Contrary to the belief of many city planners and public officials in North Carolina, highway projects do not play a large role in determining the amount and nature…
  • Press Release

    Easley, Legislature Attract Little Support in Poll

    posted October 16, 2002
    RALEIGH — With pivotal legislative elections just weeks away, likely voters in North Carolina are critical of recent actions by Gov. Mike Easley and the General Assembly on taxes, local…
  • Research Report

    Warning Signs: A Survey of North Carolina Business Leaders

    posted April 14, 2002 by John Hood, Don Carrington
    A 2002 survey of North Carolina’s most politically active business executives found that they did not necessarily agree with the current direction of public policy in the state. Business leaders from every region answered questions about fiscal policy, education, transportation, tax rates, regulation, and ways to improve economic competitiveness. They disagreed strongly with legislative decisions to raise taxes.
  • Research Report

    Changing Course IV: An Alternative Budget for North Carolina

    posted May 6, 2001 by John Hood, Dr. Roy Cordato, Don Carrington
    North Carolina faces significant fiscal and economic challenges over the next two years. But it need not resort to higher taxes, a state-run lottery, higher debt, or gimmickry to balance its budget. Nor does North Carolina need to skimp on crucial needs such as education and highways. By setting firm priorities within state government, eliminating unnecessary or duplicative programs, and charging users of some services a reasonable price, state leaders can generate sufficient savings to invest in the future needs of the state.
  • Press Release

    Smart Growth Isn’t Smart

    posted August 30, 1999
    RALEIGH — Policies associated with the “Smart Growth” movement would be disastrous for North Carolina communities, according to a new report released today by the John Locke Foundation. Smart Growth…
  • Press Release

    Increase Highway Budget

    posted March 18, 1999
    RALEIGH—North Carolina should spend an additional $410 million annually over the next seven years — without raising taxes — to get back on track in maintaining and expanding the state…

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