• Research Report

    Riding the Eminent Domain Rail: Triangle Transit Authority Is N.C.’s Case Study in Eminent Domain Abuse

    posted September 21, 2006 by Daren Bakst
    The Triangle Transit Authority (TTA) has been seizing private property for a rail system even though the necessary federal funding has never been secured. In late 2005, as it became clear that the rail was likely a dead project, the TTA still condemned land even though it meant forcing people out of their homes and businesses. TTA’s eminent domain abuse, however, may reach a new level. Through a possible public/private partnership, TTA may start using the already seized private property, and acquire additional private property, for economic development reasons. Unfortunately, current N.C. law may allow for these Kelo-type takings.
  • Press Release

    Stop Them Before They Seize Again

    posted September 21, 2006
    RALEIGH – A new public/private partnership could allow the Triangle Transit Authority (TTA) to take its history of eminent domain abuse to a new level. That’s a key finding in…
  • Research Report

    Conquering Traffic Congestion in the Capital City: More Effective Solutions Than Light Rail

    posted August 14, 2006
    For over fifteen years, the Triangle Transit Authority has pursued a regional rail for North Carolina’s capital region, to no avail. At the same time traffic congestion in the Triangle has worsened, with other viable alternatives largely being ignored. Recognizing this, it is important to understand the causes of congestion in order to develop workable solutions to the problem.
  • Press Release

    Treat Traffic Congestion at Its Source

    posted August 14, 2006
    RALEIGH – Light rail isn’t the solution to traffic congestion in the Triangle. The good news is that there are several immediate, common-sense, and far less costly solutions available to…
  • Research Report

    Policy versus Performance: Directions for North Carolina’s Largest Transit Systems

    posted May 3, 2006 by Dr. David Hartgen
    North Carolina’s largest public transit systems are often credited with reduced traffic congestion and air pollution, efficient land use, reduced dependence on oil, and much-needed mobility for some residents. Are they fulfilling these missions? How are they performing? Who do they benefit? What do they cost?

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