• John Locke Update

    Electricity policy in the post-COVID economy

    posted May 7, 2020 by Jon Sanders
    Energy poverty is a serious issue. Research shows that higher energy prices cost lives. The U.S. Energy Information Agency showed in 2018 that one in three families struggled…
  • John Locke Update

    Why Aren’t We Benefitting From Falling Costs of Solar?

    posted December 17, 2019 by Jon Sanders
    It’s a feature in reporting about solar energy to discuss how dramatically its costs have declined. That tends to be misleading because solar is a completely unreliable resource on its…
  • John Locke Update

    PURPA Rules Change Could Help Electricity Consumers

    posted December 9, 2019 by Jon Sanders
    A pending major federal rule change could create a positive change for people’s electricity bills. That could be good news, especially for North Carolinians. This fall, the Federal Energy Regulatory…
  • John Locke Update

    The Unacknowledged Costs of Wind Farms

    posted December 3, 2019 by Nick Wilkinson
    As applications for wind farms are expected to increase, the debate over the costs and benefits of these facilities will continue.  The debate should be informed by experiences and data…
  • Press Release

    Coast Law needed to block wind turbines

    posted March 9, 2008
    RALEIGH – North Carolina needs a “Coast Law” to protect residents from wind turbines that ruin local landscapes, harm wildlife, and pose potential health risks, all while providing an unreliable…
  • Research Report

    A Wind Power Primer: Emission reduction negligible for land-intensive, unreliable, noisy, ugly bird-killing turbines

    posted March 9, 2008 by Daren Bakst
    Wind power is generated through large groups of massive industrial wind turbines, sometimes as tall as 50-story skyscrapers. Like the wind itself, wind power is intermittent and extremely unreliable. The wind must be strong enough, but not too strong, to generate power. So wind cannot be used for baseload generation nor to meet peak demand. For example, to avoid a blackout, a Texas grid manager recently had to cut off electricity to some customers, in large part due to a sudden drop in wind power.

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