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Number of state-paid classroom teachers increased since 2011

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Welcome

Over the next few months, the NC Department of Public Instruction will release key personnel, financial, and student enrollment information for each of the state’s 115 school districts.  This week, I examine one of those data sets — full-time equivalent, state-paid classroom teachers.

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CommenTerry

Much of my discussion will center on the table included in the Facts and Stats section of the newsletter.  Take a minute to review it.

Welcome back.

The table represents full-time equivalent (FTE), state paid, classroom teachers as of the 3rd pay period.  The FTE counts were obtained through the NC Department of Public Instruction’s (DPI) Educational Directory and Demographical Information Exchange (EDDIE) database.  The EDDIE database includes information on school district contacts, school calendars, teacher counts, student enrollment, and many other items of interest.  NC DPI bills it as "the authoritative source for NC public school numbers and demographic information."

A few cautions are in order.  First, the data does not display changes in teachers paid with federal and local funds.  Although much of the funding for teaching positions comes from the state, it is important not to discount fluctuations in federal and local funding streams. In some cases, increases in state-funded teachers were offset by decreases in the number of teachers paid by funds from other sources.  Similarly, decreases in teachers may have been balanced by increases in funding from other sources.  NC DPI will release more detailed personnel information early next year.  At that point, we’ll know how many teaching positions were funded by state, local, and federal sources during the current school year.  A CommenTerry on those figures is all but guaranteed.

In addition, the table does not include student enrollment data.  Student enrollment statistics are important because increases and decreases in FTE teachers may reflect commensurate changes in student enrollment.  So why not include this information below?  Although various student enrollment counts are available for the 2011-12 and 2012-13 school years, they are not available for 2013-14.  Problems with DPI’s new PowerSchool data system have delayed the release of student enrollment figures for the current school year.

Finally, the teacher counts listed below reflect decisions made by central office staff and school boards to fund a range of instructional positions.  School district officials may have used their budget flexibility to fund other types of instructional positions, namely teacher assistants and coaches.  In other words, changing priorities, not changing budgets, may have produced changes in teacher counts.

The Republicans maintained a majority in the NC General Assembly during the three budget years selected.  During this time, they have been criticized for, well, everything.  But the most vocal criticisms came from those claiming that mean-spirited Republicans were destroying public education in North Carolina. 

If that were the case, we would expect FTE to decrease, not increase, beginning in 2011.  But NC DPI data show a 1,431 or 2 percent increase in classroom teachers between 2011-12 and 2013-14, as well as a small increase from 2012-13 to 2013-14.  While it remains to be seen whether this increase kept pace with statewide student enrollment growth, it undermines the idea that the Republican leadership in the NC General Assembly decimated public school classrooms.

The FTE counts for state-funded classroom teachers are one part of a much larger story, but that does not mean they should be discounted or worse, ignored.

Facts and Stats

Full-time equivalent (FTE), state paid, classroom teachers as of the 3rd pay period, 2011-2014

Note: Districts are organized by LEA number and not LEA name.

LEA No.

LEA Name

2011-12 Teacher Count

2012-13 Teacher Count

2013-14 Teacher Count

FTE Change,
2011-14

Percent Change,
2011-2014

10

Alamance-Burlington Schools

1,516

1,307

1,586

70

5%

20

Alexander County Schools

348

354

346

-2

-1%

30

Alleghany County Schools

115

116

115

0

0%

40

Anson County Schools

237

242

237

0

0%

50

Ashe County Schools

227

223

216

-11

-5%

60

Avery County Schools

147

162

166

19

13%

70

Beaufort County Schools

436

432

436

0

0%

80

Bertie County Schools

198

176

200

2

1%

90

Bladen County Schools

357

365

343

-14

-4%

100

Brunswick County Schools

680

726

717

37

5%

110

Buncombe County Schools

1,721

1,765

1,743

22

1%

111

Asheville City Schools

258

269

276

18

7%

120

Burke County Schools

839

858

876

37

4%

130

Cabarrus County Schools

1,891

1,836

1,929

38

2%

132

Kannapolis City Schools

384

388

388

4

1%

140

Caldwell County Schools

885

881

883

-2

0%

150

Camden County Schools

129

132

136

7

5%

160

Carteret County Public Schools

503

499

548

45

9%

170

Caswell County Schools

210

203

202

-8

-4%

180

Catawba County Schools

1,001

1,011

974

-27

-3%

181

Hickory City Schools

291

294

302

11

4%

182

Newton Conover City Schools

184

197

181

-3

-2%

190

Chatham County Schools

510

515

542

32

6%

200

Cherokee County Schools

229

234

234

5

2%

210

Edenton-Chowan Schools

167

163

164

-3

-2%

220

Clay County Schools

85

94

86

1

1%

230

Cleveland County Schools

1,131

1,117

1,068

-63

-6%

240

Columbus County Schools

405

410

399

-6

-1%

241

Whiteville City Schools

150

157

164

14

9%

250

Craven County Schools

907

914

889

-18

-2%

260

Cumberland County Schools

3,456

3,497

3,446

-10

0%

270

Currituck County Schools

188

238

243

55

29%

280

Dare County Schools

285

292

293

8

3%

290

Davidson County Schools

1,226

1,226

1,233

7

1%

291

Lexington City Schools

225

209

222

-3

-1%

292

Thomasville City Schools

153

158

152

-1

-1%

300

Davie County Schools

405

422

414

9

2%

310

Duplin County Schools

643

632

593

-50

-8%

320

Durham Public Schools

2,242

2,172

2,147

-95

-4%

330

Edgecombe County Public Schools

450

453

422

-28

-6%

340

Forsyth County Schools

3,480

3,551

3,515

35

1%

350

Franklin County Schools

607

618

609

2

0%

360

Gaston County Schools

1,959

2,053

2,085

126

6%

370

Gates County Schools

144

146

142

-2

-1%

380

Graham County Schools

95

97

97

2

2%

390

Granville County Schools

527

549

524

-3

-1%

400

Greene County Schools

215

237

237

22

10%

410

Guilford County Schools

4,639

4,833

4,606

-33

-1%

420

Halifax County Schools

243

241

218

-25

-10%

421

Roanoke Rapids City Schools

190

200

199

9

5%

422

Weldon City Schools

73

75

76

3

4%

430

Harnett County Schools

1,205

1,304

1,452

247

20%

440

Haywood County Schools

520

515

506

-14

-3%

450

Henderson County Schools

858

874

880

22

3%

460

Hertford County Schools

211

205

216

5

2%

470

Hoke County Schools

579

560

568

-11

-2%

480

Hyde County Schools

75

66

65

-10

-13%

490

Iredell-Statesville Schools

1,354

1,395

1,353

-1

0%

491

Mooresville Graded School District

335

354

352

17

5%

500

Jackson County Schools

235

236

241

6

3%

510

Johnston County Schools

2,130

2,228

2,248

118

6%

520

Jones County Schools

95

97

99

4

4%

530

Lee County Schools

618

637

646

28

5%

540

Lenoir County Public Schools

548

601

587

39

7%

550

Lincoln County Schools

758

780

772

14

2%

560

Macon County Schools

288

297

297

9

3%

570

Madison County Schools

188

175

197

9

5%

580

Martin County Schools

245

254

250

5

2%

590

McDowell County Schools

428

460

445

17

4%

600

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

8,732

8,196

8,611

-121

-1%

610

Mitchell County Schools

156

165

145

-11

-7%

620

Montgomery County Schools

295

285

269

-26

-9%

630

Moore County Schools

492

808

731

239

49%

640

Nash-Rocky Mount Schools

1,053

1,041

995

-58

-6%

650

New Hanover County Schools

1,558

1,596

1,539

-19

-1%

660

Northampton County Schools

168

198

161

-7

-4%

670

Onslow County Schools

1,495

1,662

1,756

261

17%

680

Orange County Schools

478

487

478

0

0%

681

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools

728

666

712

-16

-2%

690

Pamlico County Schools

113

111

114

1

1%

700

Elizabeth City-Pasquotank Public Schools

433

406

396

-37

-9%

710

Pender County Schools

495

501

531

36

7%

720

Perquimans County Schools

126

128

131

5

4%

730

Person County Schools

325

329

319

-6

-2%

740

Pitt County Schools

1,563

1,588

1,576

13

1%

750

Polk County Schools

170

181

188

18

11%

760

Randolph County Schools

1,099

1,116

1,214

115

10%

761

Asheboro City Schools

316

341

350

34

11%

770

Richmond County Schools

496

508

506

10

2%

780

Public Schools of Robeson County

1,630

1,626

1,638

8

0%

790

Rockingham County Schools

935

919

943

8

1%

800

Rowan-Salisbury Schools

1,278

1,306

1,256

-22

-2%

810

Rutherford County Schools

555

579

585

30

5%

820

Sampson County Schools

537

561

566

29

5%

821

Clinton City Schools

198

197

195

-3

-2%

830

Scotland County Schools

396

410

414

18

5%

840

Stanly County Schools

608

574

615

7

1%

850

Stokes County Schools

483

482

475

-8

-2%

860

Surry County Schools

576

570

560

-16

-3%

861

Elkin City Schools

86

72

87

1

1%

862

Mount Airy City Schools

110

120

118

8

7%

870

Swain County Schools

133

126

140

7

5%

880

Transylvania County Schools

226

228

223

-3

-1%

890

Tyrrell County Schools

47

49

48

1

2%

900

Union County Public Schools

2,518

2,619

2,604

86

3%

910

Vance County Schools

515

495

493

-22

-4%

920

Wake County Schools

9,298

9,748

9,438

140

2%

930

Warren County Schools

176

183

164

-12

-7%

940

Washington County Schools

125

122

117

-8

-6%

950

Watauga County Schools

269

273

276

7

3%

960

Wayne County Public Schools

1,309

1,340

1,297

-12

-1%

970

Wilkes County Schools

627

622

621

-6

-1%

980

Wilson County Schools

745

764

780

35

5%

990

Yadkin County Schools

395

392

381

-14

-4%

995

Yancey County Schools

170

175

174

4

2%

9999

North Carolina

 92,492

 93,842

 93,923

1,431

2%

Education Acronym of the Week

FTE — Full-Time Equivalent

Quote of the Week

"NC DPI is often asked to report the FTE for different groups of non-certified personnel. The General Assembly, Governor’s Office, State Budget Office and others use this information for various purposes and the accuracy is important. The Division of School Business uses the monthly payroll files as the authoritative source for this data and calculates the FTEs using the different data elements submitted monthly by the LEAs. This allows us to avoid surveying the data from the LEAs."

– NC Department of Public Instruction, Finance Officer Newsletter No. 014-13/14, November 1, 2013

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Dr. Stoops is the director of the Center for Effective Education. Before joining the Locke Foundation in 2005, he worked as the program assistant for the Child Welfare Education Programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work. He… ...

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