• John Locke Update

    Widespread Natural Immunity Underscores Why Vaccine Mandates Must End, Now

    posted October 7, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    While natural immunity is stronger than vaccine-induced immunity, proving natural immunity is difficult because fewer than one-fourth of infections are documented and antibodies testing is hit-or-miss. Vaccine mandates would affect more people with natural immunity (the stronger immunity) than those without any immunity, which would not justify the ostensible public-health case for such mandates. If the vaccines are effective as we know them to be, there's no need to deprive other people of their livelihoods for not being vaccinated, especially given the better-than-even odds that their immunity is better.
  • John Locke Update

    DHHS Data Show Strength of Natural Immunity in North Carolina

    posted October 6, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    DHHS data show that North Carolinians with natural immunity are much less likely to contract Covid than even vaccinated individuals. Data show the reinfection rate (a measure of the strength of natural immunity) is lower than the post-vaccination infection rate (strength of vaccination). The reinfection rate was likely less (possibly much less) than 0.8% while the post-vaccination infection rate was at least 1.3% (and possibly much greater).
  • John Locke Update

    North Carolina: No Excess Deaths From Covid Since Mid-March

    posted July 29, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Data from the CDC and state DHHS show that North Carolina has not been suffering excess deaths from Covid-19 since mid-March 2021. While Covid-19 is still out there, its effect on North Carolina is no longer causing a statistical anomaly in terms of deaths, meaning it is behaving more and more like an endemic virus, such as a flu, not a pandemic. If North Carolina is no longer witnessing excess deaths owing to Covid-19, then why does Gov. Cooper still keep the state in the minority of U.S. states still under a "State of Emergency"?
  • John Locke Update

    How Much Are Cooper’s Orders to Blame for Non-Covid Excess Deaths in North Carolina?

    posted June 25, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Research continues to find serious, deadly effects of lockdowns and severe government restrictions over Covid-19, such as Gov. Cooper's, while failing to find evidence of their purported benefits. From March 2020 through January 2021 (the end of available data), under Cooper's unrelenting orders, North Carolina has been witnessing a second excess death event other than Covid-19. It is disheartening to see evidence of an ongoing, non-Covid death event months and months after citing science and data to sound the alarm repeatedly in the hopes of warding off such grim results.
  • John Locke Update

    Reality Morphs Covid Funds into Windfall for NC K-12 Education, Part 2

    posted June 11, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    North Carolina public schools will receive over $6 billion in funding to address the academic, emotional, and social impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. Such levels of funding present high-risk and high-opportunity options for schools. Schools can ensure these funds are well spent by developing plans that are transparent, are strategic, discuss relevant trade-offs, encourage flexibility, and understand the implications of their choices.
  • John Locke Update

    Reality Morphs Covid Funds into Windfall for NC K-12 Education, Part 1

    posted June 10, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    Under the growing threat of a coronavirus combined with the government-imposed economic shutdown, Congress approved $6 billion in Covid-19 relief funds for K-12 public schools in North Carolina. A recovering economy has taken the worst-case scenarios off the table and resulted in more aid for K-12 schools than at any time in recent history. These dollars should be returned to taxpayers; otherwise, state leaders should take proper steps to ensure they are spent wisely and accomplish intended purposes.
  • John Locke Update

    Average teacher pay is stagnant, and Democrats and the pandemic are to blame

    posted April 8, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Since 2019, after rocketing upward for seven years, North Carolina’s average teacher salary has increased by only $452, or 0.8 percent. Democratic obstructionism and uncertain economic conditions at the height of the pandemic led to two consecutive years of negligible salary growth.
  • John Locke Update

    Policy differences across states have little impact on Covid Misery Index

    posted March 31, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    It is not clear that states have sacrificed jobs to save lives or sacrificed lives to save jobs. North Carolina now does well on the combined impact of Covid deaths and lost jobs. This analysis does not, however, include other causes of death, mental health issues arising from isolation, learning losses in K-12 schools, or increases in child abuse and domestic violence that could be costs of tighter restrictions.

COVID-19 by Author