• John Locke Update

    Preventing eminent domain abuse in North Carolina

    posted July 30, 2020 by Jon Guze
    The John Locke Foundation and the North Carolina Advocates for Justice recently filed a joint amicus or “friend of the court” brief in support of a Wake County…
  • John Locke Update

    Time for the N.C. Senate to Step Up on Eminent Domain

    posted March 12, 2019 by Jon Guze
    The Castle Coalition is a national membership organization made up of homeowners and small business owners that want to protect their property from eminent domain abuse. To help its…
  • Press Release

    Eminent domain amendment should provide real protection

    posted January 26, 2011
    Click here to view and here to listen to Daren Bakst discussing this Spotlight report. RALEIGH — Legislators should provide real property-rights protections as they pursue a constitutional…
  • Research Report

    The First 100 Days: Eleven Action Items for the 2011 Legislative Session

    posted November 11, 2010 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    This report highlights eleven action items that North Carolina’s new General Assembly should seek to implement in the first 100 days of the 2011 legislative session. These items touch upon a cross section of public policy areas, including education, economic development, property rights, energy and the environment, health care, the budget, and transparency. We at the John Locke Foundation believe that these items represent straightforward actions that would greatly enhance the liberty and prosperity of North Carolina’s citizens.
  • Research Report

    Seize Property As a Last Resort: Eminent domain bill should protect humans, not just natural habitats

    posted June 14, 2009 by Daren Bakst
    In North Carolina, the government can invoke eminent domain and seize private property even if reasonable alternatives exist to using this power. A recent Senate bill (SB 600) would allow conservation easement holders to challenge takings in court by requiring the government to prove that no prudent and feasible alternatives exist to condemnation of properties encumbered by conservation easements.

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