• John Locke Update

    Economic analysis is essential to sound public health policy

    posted April 30, 2020 by Dr. Donald R. van der Vaart
    As we struggle through the COVID-19 pandemic, our government has responded by imposing economically severe restrictions on our lives. In doing so, elected officials must remember that imposing costly public…
  • John Locke Update

    Unlike climate change, COVID-19 is an actual existential threat

    posted April 8, 2020 by Dr. Donald R. van der Vaart
    The COVID-19 pandemic has readjusted many of our priorities. The country is pulling together for a common goal: to “flatten the curve.” Many are putting their jobs, careers, education, and…
  • John Locke Update

    Good Riddance to Obama’s Clean Power Plan

    posted October 19, 2017 by Jon Sanders
    On October 10, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officially moved to repeal controversial Obama-era emissions guidelines known as the “Clean Power Plan” (CPP). The rule was based in a…
  • Research Report

    Second-Best Ozone Season in a Decade: NC’s 2010 ozone season comes in like a lion, goes out like a lamb

    posted November 21, 2010 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    In 2010, North Carolina recorded the second-lowest number of high-ozone days of the last decade. Statewide, a total of 106 high ozone monitor readings were recorded over 26 days from April 1 to October 31, with 32 of those readings occurring on just eight monitors in two metropolitan areas. Despite what might be the popular belief, smog levels in North Carolina have been getting better, not worse.
  • Research Report

    The Clean Smokestacks Bill: A Retrospective

    posted March 4, 2010 by Kamen Nikolaev, Dr. Roy Cordato
    In 2002 the State of North Carolina passed what was officially titled “Improve Air Quality/Electric Utilities,” which became better known as the Clean Smokestacks Bill (CSB). When the CSB was passed in 2002, it was estimated to cost $2.3 billion.
  • Research Report

    A Decade of Data on Smog: Just the facts

    posted September 1, 2009 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    In 2008 the EPA dramatically tightened its standards for defining a high ozone day. Even under EPA’s more stringent new standard, North Carolina — both as a whole and within its major regions — has experienced significant reductions in the number of high ozone days.

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