• John Locke Update

    The End of the Road for the Map Act

    posted June 26, 2019 by Jon Guze
    At long last, the North Carolina General Assembly has finally repealed a controversial piece of legislation known as the Map Act. As I explained in a previous Legal…
  • Research Report

    The Map Act: JLF’s amicus brief in Kirby v. NCDOT

    posted November 8, 2015 by Jon Guze
    The John Locke Foundation has a long-standing interest in the Map Act, which we have criticized for being “inefficient, unfair, and unnecessary.” We have repeatedly urged the General Assembly to repeal or reform it. We have also taken a keen interest in Kirby v. NCDOT and in the legal and constitutional issues that it raises.
  • Research Report

    Wrong Way: How the Map Act threatens NC property owners

    posted March 5, 2014
    The North Carolina Map Act virtually freezes property development within proposed road corridors and can encumber and devalue property indefinitely. North Carolina should protect the constitutional property rights of its citizens by repealing or reforming the Map Act.
  • Research Report

    Should NCDOT Add More Piedmont Trains?

    posted April 26, 2011 by Wendell Cox
    A high-speed rail proposal for North Carolina would create substantial risks for taxpayers, while doing little to nothing to reduce traffic, help the environment, cut energy use, or create jobs. North Carolina should return the federal high-speed rail grant funding, withdraw its pending application, and seek no more funding for passenger rail.
  • Press Release

    N.C. transportation policy needs new priorities

    posted October 17, 2007
    RALEIGH – This year’s high-profile Minneapolis bridge disaster exposes North Carolina’s need for new state transportation priorities. That’s the key finding in a new John Locke Foundation Spotlight report.
  • Research Report

    No, Fix the Roads First: How N.C. has taken transportation out of transportation policy

    posted October 17, 2007 by Daren Bakst
    The Minneapolis I-35 bridge disaster and the poor condition of North Carolina’s bridges should be a wake-up call for policymakers to set sensible priorities for transportation policy. N.C. has 17,782 bridges, of which 5,082 (29 percent) are deemed deficient by the federal government. N.C. ranks 32nd in the nation in percentage of deficient bridges — 10th worst in total number of deficient bridges.

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