• John Locke Update

    Stay Vigilant in the Fight Against Red Tape

    posted June 21, 2018 by Jon Sanders
    A new look at rule-making activity in North Carolina shows that regulation, as the old beach tee puts it, keeps on truckin’. In past years, the John Locke Foundation published…
  • John Locke Update

    Throttling Down Some on Costly Rulemaking

    posted January 18, 2018 by Jon Sanders
    The conference report on House Bill 162, which has already passed the Senate, includes a common-sense adjustment of the state’s sunset provisions with periodic review. That regulatory…
  • Research Report

    The Special Interest Effect

    posted July 5, 2017 by Dr. Roy Cordato
    What do subsidies for “green” energy, mandated health insurance benefits, and quotas on imported sugar all have in common? Most obviously, all three policies generate a wealth transfer from the…
  • Research Report

    Hard to Swallow

    posted November 18, 2016
    The Cato Institute regularly publishes a report titled Freedom in the 50 States.1 According to the most recent edition, since 2010, North Carolina has improved substantially, advancing from 26th…
  • Research Report

    The Map Act: JLF’s amicus brief in Kirby v. NCDOT

    posted November 8, 2015 by Jon Guze
    The John Locke Foundation has a long-standing interest in the Map Act, which we have criticized for being “inefficient, unfair, and unnecessary.” We have repeatedly urged the General Assembly to repeal or reform it. We have also taken a keen interest in Kirby v. NCDOT and in the legal and constitutional issues that it raises.
  • Research Report

    The Case Against CON: A law that prevents health care innovation

    posted June 2, 2015 by Katherine Restrepo
    What the healthcare industry needs is a strong dose of disruptive innovation — relaxing regulations that will increase provider competition, force downward pressure on costs, and enhance patient choice. CON ultimately picks who gets to compete within the health care sector. Reforming the law will by no means untangle the complexities of health care, but state lawmakers should capitalize on an opportunity to make one of the most highly regulated industries a little less heavy on the red tape and a little more patient friendly.

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