• John Locke Update

    Teacher Pay in North Carolina: Sweet Spots and Sour Notes

    posted April 9, 2019 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    In March, the National Education Association released teacher salary data from its upcoming “Rankings of the States 2018 and Estimates of School Statistics 2019” report. Republican lawmakers welcomed the news…
  • John Locke Update

    N.C. Teachers are Getting Political

    posted May 11, 2018 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    The May 16 teacher gathering in Raleigh is inspired by teacher demonstrations in other states and is energized by the desire of public school advocacy groups to weaken Republican control…
  • John Locke Update

    Teacher Pay Rankings, Facts, and Figures

    posted April 26, 2018 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    On Monday, the National Education Association (NEA) released their annual Rankings and Estimates report.  According to the report, North Carolina’s average teacher salary for 2018, estimated by NEA researchers…
  • John Locke Update

    Average teacher pay statistics are misleading

    posted December 9, 2015 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    View in your browser. Welcome Is North Carolina’s average teacher pay a reflection of the “greening” of our workforce? Probably. CommenTerry In…
  • Research Report

    North Carolina Budget FY 2015 – 17

    posted September 21, 2015 by Sarah Curry
    For fiscal year 2015-16, the General Fund budget will rise 3.1 percent to $21.7 billion, below the combined rates of population growth and inflation. The following year, the budget will have an overall increase of less than one-percent.
  • Research Report

    An Alternative Budget: Response to the governor’s proposed budget for the upcoming biennium

    posted May 17, 2015 by Research Staff
    The John Locke Foundation is continuing its tradition, started in 1995, of offering an alternative to the governor’s budget recommendation. Consistent with prior years, this JLF budget focuses on core government. This budget spends less in both years of the biennium than the governor’s, and only increases spending by 2 percent from the last fiscal year.
  • Research Report

    The Best of Both Budgets: “Reverse logrolling” would help legislators produce a sound spending plan

    posted June 17, 2014 by Sarah Curry
    Reverse logrolling applied to the current state budget would result in a General Fund budget of $20.6 billion and a $667 million surplus, which would allow legislators more flexibility when discussing spending priorities, including teacher pay increases. It would also allow enough to be set aside in savings and reserves to avoid any unforeseen shortfalls in the next fiscal year.

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