• John Locke Update

    Should North Carolina Restore Salary Supplements for Master’s Degrees?

    posted August 26, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    The state House budget would restore salary supplements for public school educators with a master’s degree. Decades of empirical research failed to establish a relationship between master’s degrees and student performance. Possible research-based compromises include restoring master’s pay for teachers who obtain their degrees in their teaching subject or supporting teachers who pursue National Board Certification.
  • John Locke Update

    An Overview of the N.C. House Education Budget

    posted August 12, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    House budget writers proposed a $25.7 billion biennial budget that would grant an average 5.5% raise to teachers and give multiple bonuses. The House budget would expand private school choice and ease regulations on public charter schools. Lawmakers propose extensive measures to augment academic transparency and accountability.
  • John Locke Update

    House Budget Plan Features Tax Cuts, Assertive Infrastructure Spending, and Pay Raises

    posted August 11, 2021 by Paige Terryberry
    The House budget plan, per previous agreement, would spend about the same total amount as the Senate plan. Differences exist, however, primarily with a less aggressive tax cut plan and more aggressive pay raises to teachers and state employees. Similar to the Senate plan, the House proposal would set aside significant funds in the Savings Reserve and Capital Infrastructure funds.
  • John Locke Update

    A Closer Look at Education in the Senate Budget Plan

    posted June 23, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    The Senate budget plan would address current education spending needs, increase salaries for teachers and education personnel and offer bonuses, and increase all steps of base teacher salaries. It would also expand eligibility for Opportunity Scholarships, raise the value of the scholarships, and increase the annual payment to the Opportunity Scholarship Grant Fund Reserve. These are steps in the right direction, but the budget needs to be more responsive to parents seeking additional educational options and other ways to redress the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the education of our children.
  • John Locke Update

    Teacher Pay: A Look at the Last Decade

    posted June 3, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    Overall, North Carolina teacher pay has improved despite periods of no or moderate pay increases. North Carolina ranks 34th nationally and 2nd in the Southeast in teacher pay. The increase in teacher benefits — specifically the rising cost of retirement benefits — is the biggest reason for the escalating costs of teacher compensation.
  • John Locke Update

    Lack of teachers may threaten learning loss summer program

    posted May 5, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Because teachers have the option of declining summer employment, summer learning programs designed to address learning loss may be short-staffed. Reasons for opting out of the summer learning programs vary, but they fall into three categories: political, financial, and psychological.
  • John Locke Update

    How much do teachers make in North Carolina? It depends who you ask

    posted April 30, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    For 2020-21, North Carolina’s average teacher salary is $54,392, which is ranked 34th in the nation according to the National Education Association. The statewide average salary increased by around 21 percent between 2014 and 2021. The NC Association of Educators insists that the calculation of the average is flawed.
  • John Locke Update

    Cooper’s reckless budget, Part 2: A closer look at appropriations

    posted April 13, 2021 by Joseph Coletti
    The largest increase in Cooper's proposed state appropriations would be for employee salaries and benefits. Cooper's proposal does not provide price tags for Leandro or Medicaid expansion. Cooper would also eliminate successful and popular Opportunity Scholarships.
  • John Locke Update

    Average teacher pay is stagnant, and Democrats and the pandemic are to blame

    posted April 8, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Since 2019, after rocketing upward for seven years, North Carolina’s average teacher salary has increased by only $452, or 0.8 percent. Democratic obstructionism and uncertain economic conditions at the height of the pandemic led to two consecutive years of negligible salary growth.

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