• John Locke Update

    NC Supreme Court at a Crossroads?

    posted September 23, 2021 by Jon Guze
    The NAACP has asked the North Carolina Supreme Court to overturn the results of the 2018 election as they pertain to two constitutional amendments approved by the voters. It has been reported that the four Democrats on the court may try to disqualify two Republican justices from the case, a partisan attack that, in addition to being unjustified and unprecedented, would do lasting damage to the court as an institution and permanently damage the reputations and electoral prospects of the justices involved. If successful, such an attack would also have the effect of disenfranchising the North Carolina voters who approved the constitutional amendments and the voters who elected the disqualified justices.
  • John Locke Update

    Energy Crossroads, Part 2: Reliable, Cost-Effective Alternatives to Cooper’s Disastrous Plan

    posted September 22, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    By favoring wind and solar generation with battery storage to the exclusion of viable, dependable sources, Gov. Cooper's "Clean Energy Plan" would be extremely expensive, costing consumers an average of $411 per year more for electricity. It would cost $123.86 per metric ton of CO2 emissions reduced and take up more land than the state's three largest counties combined. Alternatives provided for Locke by energy researcher Jordan McGillis showed that emissions reductions could be achieved via more natural gas or nuclear facilities at much less expense to consumers and with a miniscule environmental footprint.
  • John Locke Update

    Energy Crossroads, Part 1: Cooper’s Plan Is Unnecessary and Fraught with Costs to Consumers and the Environment

    posted September 21, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Cooper's "Clean Energy Plan" has a very definite preference for extremely expensive, intermittent, and unreliable electricity resources, to the exclusion of viable, dependable resources. A report for Locke by energy researcher Jordan McGillis showed that Duke Energy's scenario most closely aligned with Cooper's plan would level enormous costs to consumers. Such reliance on wind and solar generation and battery storage carries many hidden and unconsidered environmental, supply-chain, ecological, and land-use costs.
  • John Locke Update

    Redistricting Dilemmas: All the King’s Horses and All the King’s Men Cannot Put Caldwell County Back Together Again

    posted September 20, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    Caldwell County leaders do not want the county to be split in redistricting, and the county has political clout. Despite that, Caldwell County is certainly going to be split between state Senate districts and may be split between state House districts. Caldwell County’s redistricting predicament demonstrates how the constraints of law and geography limit how legislators can draw districts.
  • John Locke Update

    Mask Wars? There Is a Way Forward

    posted September 15, 2021 by Dr. Robert Luebke
    School districts' mask requirements reveal deep differences about who should make decisions about children’s health and how they are educated. Florida allows parents of children who were threatened or bullied because of mask choice to attend another public or private school of their choice. North Carolina should consider similar legislation; giving parents the choice over how and where their child is educated is key to ending the mask wars.
  • John Locke Update

    Where Did Critical Race Theory Come From?

    posted September 14, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Critical race theorists argue that white supremacy is an underlying structure at the heart of American institutions, social structures, and professed ideals. Marxism offered a starting point for the development of Critical Theory and Postmodernism in the twentieth century. These intellectual movements sought to extend Karl Marx’s critique of capitalism to other aspects of society, politics, and culture. Starting in the 1970s, a group of legal scholars borrowing heavily from Critical Theory and Postmodernism began creating an intellectual foundation that would become critical race theory.
  • John Locke Update

    Four Key Differences Between the House, Senate, and Cooper Budget Plans

    posted September 13, 2021 by Paige Terryberry
    The North Carolina General Assembly is still finalizing a two-year budget. Budget proposals from the House, Senate, and governor would have varying effects on North Carolina’s fiscal future. Spending restraint, tax cuts, and considerable savings would contribute to more opportunities and bigger paychecks for North Carolina families.
  • John Locke Update

    What “County Clusters” Mean for North Carolina’s Redistricting Process

    posted September 10, 2021 by Dr. Andy Jackson
    North Carolina’s unique county clustering process is a way of balancing constitutional requirements of keeping counties whole and having equal populations of legislative districts. The county clustering process is simple in principle but can be complex in application. The whole county provision of the North Carolina State Constitution and redistricting criteria adopted by the General Assembly substantially influence how districts can be drawn within county clusters.
  • John Locke Update

    Test Scores Show Learning Loss Is Real

    posted September 9, 2021 by Dr. Terry Stoops
    Proficiency rates on most state English, math, and science tests plummeted in 2021. Cooper consistently failed to weigh the costs and benefits of imposing restrictions on in-person learning in 2020. The broad educational, psychological, social, and economic effects of pandemic-era education policies will take years to understand fully.
  • John Locke Update

    What Are School Mask Mandates Doing to Children?

    posted September 7, 2021 by Jon Sanders
    Nearly every public school district in North Carolina is forcing face masks on students. Researchers are sounding the alarm about the psychological, physical, social, developmental, and academic harms of masks on young schoolchildren. With the benefits so uncertain and the potential costs so large, we must be asking whether these mandates are really worth it.

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